Cancer is Limerick’s leading cause of death and illness

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Advertisement Limerick women kept in the dark over tests TAGScancerIrish lifelife insuranceMartin Duffy Facebook Irish Life Health of the Nation research reveals significantly fewer people in Ireland are happier in 2020 Print Miriam O’Callaghan urges Limerick to fight back against cancer WhatsAppcenter_img Linkedin NewsHealthCancer is Limerick’s leading cause of death and illnessBy Staff Reporter – February 3, 2018 1974 Limerick Hospital Group had highest exposure to CPE superbug Cancer is Limerick’s biggest killer according to Irish Life.Cancer continues to be the main cause of death and illness in Limerick.According to figures to the latest annual claims report from Irish Life Assurance company. Cancer was once again the main cause of both life Insurance and specified Illness claims for people living in Limerick city and county, followed by heart-related conditions.The company confirmed that it paid out €6.1 million in claims in Limerick during 2017. The report provides a unique insight into the health of the nation, and includes a breakdown of the illnesses and conditions that led to payments by Irish Life of €187.8 million in total to 2,582 customers and their families affected by illness and death during 2017.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In 2017, the average age of Life Insurance claims in Limerick was 62 years, while the average age of those with Specified Illness claims was 53 years.Martin Duffy, Head of Underwriting and Protection Claims with Irish Life Retail, commented; “We paid an average of €3.6 million a week last year to people and families affected by illness and death in Ireland. In fact, we paid 95 per cent of the life insurance and specified illness claims we received last year.”The claims report highlighted that the number of people dying from cancer in Ireland remains high, as 54 per cent women and 38 per cent of men died from cancer in 2017. Heart-related conditions also feature as a main cause of death, with men five times more likely to die from a heart condition when compared to women.The largest individual life insurance claim of €5,075,000 was paid out to the family of a claimant who died of cancer. €146,000 was paid to the family of a claimant in their 40s who died of cancer shortly after starting a life insurance policy.Overall, prostate cancer was the leading cancer claim for men in Ireland 19 per cent followed by lung cancer and colon cancer. Breast cancer was the main type of cancer claim for women 39 per cent, followed by colon cancer and ovarian cancer.More about health here. #BREAKING €2.5 million for cancer patient UHL leads the way on free parking for patients Email Previous articleCall for Limerick public to be part of a sponsored silenceNext articleFour Limerick schools secure places in finals of Dell EMC competition Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie last_img read more

Harrogate cupcake maker lands Asda deal

first_imgCupcake producer Mama Doreen’s has won a listing in Asda following a tie-up with deliciouslyorkshire.The Harrogate-based business, which uses local ingredients from Yorkshire, will initially supply five ranges to the supermarket chain’s Pudsey branch: Sticky Toffee, Vanilla, Lemon, Chocolate and a seasonal range.Mama Doreen’s was initially introduced to the Asda buyer at the Great Yorkshire Show, where the business was exhibiting under the deliciouslyorkshire banner. At the regional food group’s awards in November 2010, Asda local sourcing manager Alison Hamlett was also given the opportunity to taste Mama Doreen’s cupcakes as part of Asda’s sponsorship of the bakery award.Director of Mama Doreen’s Jessica Bradley said: “As a small local business we would have really struggled to grab the attention of a brand such as Asda if it wasn’t for the support provided by deliciouslyorkshire.”Becky Boyes, trade development specialist at deliciouslyorkshire, added: “The deliciouslyorkshire awards have become widely recognised as a prestigious accolade in the region’s food industry and, for producers like Mama Doreen’s, it gives them the platform to meet and impress major retailers – such as Asda – which they would not usually be able to do.”last_img read more

Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberg

first_img Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberg February 15, 2002 Managing Editor Regular News Mark D. Killian Managing EditorFormer Chief Justice Alan Sundberg was remembered by friends and colleagues attending a packed memorial service at the Supreme Court as a man “who walked with kings” yet never forgot the common touch.Sundberg, a member of the Florida State University Board of Trustees and one of the most highly regarded appellate lawyers in the state, died January 26. A Tallahassee resident, he had been undergoing treatment for lung cancer at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. He was 68.Chief Justice Charles Wells said Sundberg was a positive force for the court, the state, and the nation and said his life was dedicated to service to others. Wells also said Sundberg was a very close friend of those serving on the present court, and his counsel and guidance will be missed.Former Attorney General Jim Smith remembered his good friend and law partner as a brilliant Harvard-educated attorney with a down-to-earth manner who throughly enjoyed the outdoors.“Alan could sit up here during the week and do battle with the greatest legal minds in Florida and on the weekends go to the hunting camp or the fishing camp and just be one of the guys,” Smith said.Sundberg was born June 23, 1933, in Jacksonville and graduated from Florida State University in 1955 and Harvard in 1958. He practiced in St. Petersburg for 17 years before Gov. Reubin Askew appointed him to the Supreme Court in 1975. Askew and many others credited him with rebuilding the reputation and image of the court. Sundberg served until 1982 and was chief justice from 1980-82.Probably Justice Sundberg’s most significant opinion was in 1979, a landmark case allowing cameras in state courtrooms. He wrote the opinion that found that having cameras in courtrooms was consistent with the state’s commitment to open government and did not violate defendants’ constitutional rights. After leaving the court, he was a partner in the Carlton Fields law firm in Tallahassee.FSU President Sandy D’Alemberte then brought Sundberg to FSU to serve as the university’s general counsel in 1997. Sundberg returned to private practice in 2000 at the Smith, Ballard & Logan firm in Tallahassee.D’Alemberte said Sundberg gave Florida State great legal advice, “but more than that he was a wise counselor — a lawyer statesman.”“He was tall and jovial and bright; he was large and never intimidating; interested but never invasive; principled but certainly not stuffy; intelligent but not arrogant; humble but not reserved,” D’Alemberte said.Arthur England, who met Sundberg when they both served on the court, remembered him as a man who was “unfailingly kind” to everybody, from the other justices to clerks in the mail room.“He was a man who believed the law was a profession,” England said. “He was a man who was invariably fair to the people who opposed him, just like he was to the people who supported him.” And he possessed a common sense that served him, and the state, well.“Alan loved the intellectual aspects of decision-making as a justice of the Florida Supreme Court and he vigorously applied this intellect in every single thing he did on this court,” England said. “Yet Alan never let the intellectual side of decision-making interfere with his practical common sense.”England said Sundberg could be humble and had a special way of reminding himself that he did not always have all the answers.“With almost every decision this court rendered. . . on the Wednesday before those decision were released. . . he would say to me, ‘How will this play in Perry?’” England recalled. “What he meant by that is: How will this decision be received by the people 50 miles down the street in Perry, Florida? Will it affect their lives? Will it make a difference? Will they even care? And that’s how he worried.”Miami lawyer and longtime Sundberg friend Robert Parks served as Sundberg’s campaign manager for a Supreme Court election in 1976 and remembered an eventful day during the campaign as he was driving Sundberg to the airport in his small sports car.Running late to catch a flight, Parks said the 6-foot-6 justice split his pants “from waist to crotch” when he climbed down into Park’s Datsun 240Z. Not wanting to miss his flight, Sundberg told Parks to “keep driving” as he climbed into the back of the small hatchback to change.“He said, ‘If you don’t get me to the plane on time, your appellate career is history,’” Parks said. To which Parks replied: “If I get stopped going 80 miles an hour with a half-clothed Supreme Court justice in my car, we’re both history.”Sundberg is survived by his wife, Betty Steffens, a lawyer in Tallahassee; his son, William L. Sundberg, also a lawyer in Tallahassee; daughters Allison Lane, La Jolla, Calif.; Angela Estes, Winter Park; and Laura Sundberg, Orlando; a brother, Richard Sundberg of Jacksonville; and eight grandchildren. Another son, Alan Jr., died of skin cancer in 1998.In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions to the Florida Skin Cancer Foundation, 335 Beard St., Tallahassee 32303, or the American Diabetes Association.center_img Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberglast_img read more

Pixel 5 Gap Issue ‘Normal Part of Design’, Does Not Affect Water and Dust Resistance: Google

first_imgGoogle has responded to the ‘gap’ issue on some Pixel 5 units. Few early users reported that their Pixel 5 units have a small gap between the display and the frame. The users took to the Internet to complain that this gap is prone to collecting dust and may affect the phone’s rated capabilities to water and dust resistance. Google has responded to these user complaints by claiming that this gap is a ‘normal part of the design’ and that it has no effect on the water and dust resistance or functionality of the phone.The tech giant responded to complaints on its support page, saying that this isn’t a defect, but ‘a normal part of the design of the Pixel 5.’ The company said that the gap between the display and the body will not affect the phone’s water and dust resistance or functionality. In any event, Google said that it will work with affected individuals to address any concerns they may have.- Advertisement – Earlier last month, Pixel 5 users took to Google’s Pixel Phone Community forums to share photos of a small yet visible gap appearing between the display and frame. Troubled users claimed that the gap could let in dust particles and could hamper the IP68-rated water and dust resistance of the phone. Affected users also opted for a replacement, though that does not resolve the issue as the same is visible on their new replaced unit as well. Now, Google said that this isn’t a defect. There is no clarity, however, on how Google plans to relieve buyers of their ‘gap’ concerns.After Google’s unhelpful response, users have swarmed in to ask for better clarity. Some users are asking Google to offer a refund guarantee if any issue should arise in the future. Few users are even looking to opt for a immediate refund after the response.Is Android One holding back Nokia smartphones in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Duke watches stalemate at Villa Park

first_imgAston Villa and Sunderland played out a largely forgettable 0-0 draw in front of the watching Duke of Cambridge at Villa Park. Both sides enjoyed half-chances inside the opening five minutes, Agbonlahor heading wide at the back post while Andrea Dossena – one of those recalled for the Black Cats alongside Borini and ex-Villa midfielder Craig Gardner – fired into the side-netting at the other end. However, the opening quarter of a cagey clash was dominated by a lack of quality in the final third with neither goalkeeper forced into a real save of note. The hosts lived dangerously during a couple of Sunderland corners but the away side lacked the cutting edge to take advantage. The first clear chance went the way of Villa in the 29th minute but an unmarked Benteke could only fire high and wide from 12 yards. Sebastian Larsson curled a free-kick narrowly off target for the visitors while Delph let go of an effort from long-range. Gardner had the ball in the net just prior to half-time but was rightly flagged for offside, before Giaccherini – in plenty of space – somehow put over the crossbar from four yards having been found by Phil Bardsley’s header. Villa started the second half the brighter of the two sides but Vito Mannone was merely forced into a couple of routine stops. The game’s closest opening came in the 66th minute as Borini header Giaccherini’s left-wing cross against the woodwork. Poyet and Lambert made changes as they went of search of a late winner, Benteke being replaced by Libor Kozak, but neither side could find anything in the final third as both sides were forced to settle for a share of the spoils. Press Association The hosts were looking for their first home back-to-back Barclays Premier League victories since August 2010 but not even Villa supporter Prince William, donning a club scarf and coat as he looked on from owner Randy Lerner’s executive box, could inspire them to victory. Indeed it was Sunderland who came closest to all three points as they chased their first away win of the season, although they do return to the north east with a first point on their travels since the end of August. In stark contrast to the Black Cats’ recent home form, Gus Poyet had overseen three away defeats which contained three red cards and three own goals since taking charge. But recalled striker Fabio Borini came closest to a winner as his glancing second-half header rebounded off the crossbar, while Emanuele Giaccherini contributed a worthy contender for miss of the season from a mere four yards just before half-time. As poor as Sunderland have been away from home this year – 12 defeats from 15 league games in 2013 before kick-off – Villa have struggled almost as much in front of their own fans. A 2-0 win over Cardiff last time out was only the club’s 11th league victory in 44 attempts at Villa Park. And there was very little for the 33,036 present to get excited about, with star striker Christian Benteke, now without a goal in seven appearances, largely anonymous in attack and even substituted before full-time. The dour encounter proved a far cry from Villa’s 6-1 success in last season’s corresponding fixture in April. Wes Brown took his place in Sunderland’s starting XI having seen last week’s controversial red card at Stoke rescinded upon appeal, manager Poyet making three changes from the 2-0 defeat at the Britannia Stadium. Paul Lambert, meanwhile, handed starts to Gabriel Agbonlahor, Andreas Weimann and Fabian Delph after the fit-again trio came off the bench to inspire a second-half comeback in Monday’s 2-2 draw at West Brom. Antonio Luna also returned from injury. last_img read more