Radcliffe Science Library set to close until summer 2021

first_imgBooks that have not been borrowed in the last two years will be held in the Bodleian book storage facility offsite, but students and researchers will be able to request them for delivery via SOLO to be put back on open shelves. The RSL is the main teaching and research science library at the university, and the library holds the Legal Deposit material for all MPLS and medical disciplines. One part of the library, the Jackson Wing, is Grade II listed. It gains its name from John Radcliffe, a major benefactor of the University. The 26,000 books in the RSL collection that have been borrowed in the last two years will be temporarily relocated to the Vere Harmsworth Library during the Christmas vacation, from which all science library services will be delivered until May/June 2021. Bodleian Libraries has revealed that these books were moved offsite during the recent summer vacation. The Radcliffe Science Library (RSL) is set to close from January 2020 until summer 2021, as revealed by Bodleian Libraries in new plans. The college will share its building with the Radcliffe Science Library, and from its reopening in 2021, the library shelves will also include Parks College collections. The redevelopment of the site will also include the western wing of the Organic Chemistry Laboratory and Abbot’s Kitchen. The Vere Harmsworth Library is located on the upper floors of the Rothermere American Institute on South Parks Road, and is Oxford University’s principal research library for American Studies. The refurbishments are part of the planned Parks College Development, which will establish a new graduate college on the Parks Road site, in the heart of the University Science Area. Plans to use the Science Library as the site for Parks College were announced in December 2018. The historic RSL will remain in the building on the second floor, but the first floor will be instead dedicated to Parks College administration and social spaces, including a function room, dining hall and lounge. The Radcliffe Science Library was first established in 1861. The current building was opened in 1901, and the Library was integrated into the Bodleian Library in 1927. Bodleian Libraries have been contacted for comment.last_img read more

STS9, TAUK, and SunSquabi Lift Off At Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas [Photos]

first_imgSTS9 came to Sin City this past weekend for a highly anticipated two-night run at Brooklyn Bowl in Las Vegas, NV. With TAUK and SunSquabi on as support, it was all brights lights, big city on the Vegas strip for an incredible weekend of music. Check out a full picture gallery of both nights courtesy of Erik Kabik Photography & Paul Citone Photography and video below via Heady Flair:STS9 | Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas | Las Vegas, NV | 3/31/17 SetlistSet I: Mobsters, F Word, Light Years>>, Wika Chikana, 20-12, Ad Explorata> Shock Doctrine, TotemSet II: Get Loud, Instantly>>Nautilus>>Instantly, Sun, Moon and Stars, Gobnugget>>Surreality>>Eb, The RabbleE: Music, UsSTS9 | Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas | Las Vegas, NV | 4/1/17Set I: To The World, Frequencies 2 >*Out Of This World >>Frequencies 3, Really Wut, Looking Back On Earth, Hubble **, MarchSet II: Bigs, Worry No More, Moonsocket *** >4 Year Puma >Moonsocket >> 4 Year Puma >>Moonsocket*^, Hi-Key, Oil & Water > Zach****, Grow >>Call Jam >>Grow *^*, SchemeE: SatoriShow Notes:*Rent tease** We’re Sharing audio sample*** Insane intro and an incredible standout version*^ Inspire teases**** Are you guys having as much fun as we are?*^* Incredible Grow Call mashup with a really incredible drum jam by Jeffree and Zach.[setlist courtesy of The Church of STS9] Photo: Paul Citone Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberg

first_img Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberg February 15, 2002 Managing Editor Regular News Mark D. Killian Managing EditorFormer Chief Justice Alan Sundberg was remembered by friends and colleagues attending a packed memorial service at the Supreme Court as a man “who walked with kings” yet never forgot the common touch.Sundberg, a member of the Florida State University Board of Trustees and one of the most highly regarded appellate lawyers in the state, died January 26. A Tallahassee resident, he had been undergoing treatment for lung cancer at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. He was 68.Chief Justice Charles Wells said Sundberg was a positive force for the court, the state, and the nation and said his life was dedicated to service to others. Wells also said Sundberg was a very close friend of those serving on the present court, and his counsel and guidance will be missed.Former Attorney General Jim Smith remembered his good friend and law partner as a brilliant Harvard-educated attorney with a down-to-earth manner who throughly enjoyed the outdoors.“Alan could sit up here during the week and do battle with the greatest legal minds in Florida and on the weekends go to the hunting camp or the fishing camp and just be one of the guys,” Smith said.Sundberg was born June 23, 1933, in Jacksonville and graduated from Florida State University in 1955 and Harvard in 1958. He practiced in St. Petersburg for 17 years before Gov. Reubin Askew appointed him to the Supreme Court in 1975. Askew and many others credited him with rebuilding the reputation and image of the court. Sundberg served until 1982 and was chief justice from 1980-82.Probably Justice Sundberg’s most significant opinion was in 1979, a landmark case allowing cameras in state courtrooms. He wrote the opinion that found that having cameras in courtrooms was consistent with the state’s commitment to open government and did not violate defendants’ constitutional rights. After leaving the court, he was a partner in the Carlton Fields law firm in Tallahassee.FSU President Sandy D’Alemberte then brought Sundberg to FSU to serve as the university’s general counsel in 1997. Sundberg returned to private practice in 2000 at the Smith, Ballard & Logan firm in Tallahassee.D’Alemberte said Sundberg gave Florida State great legal advice, “but more than that he was a wise counselor — a lawyer statesman.”“He was tall and jovial and bright; he was large and never intimidating; interested but never invasive; principled but certainly not stuffy; intelligent but not arrogant; humble but not reserved,” D’Alemberte said.Arthur England, who met Sundberg when they both served on the court, remembered him as a man who was “unfailingly kind” to everybody, from the other justices to clerks in the mail room.“He was a man who believed the law was a profession,” England said. “He was a man who was invariably fair to the people who opposed him, just like he was to the people who supported him.” And he possessed a common sense that served him, and the state, well.“Alan loved the intellectual aspects of decision-making as a justice of the Florida Supreme Court and he vigorously applied this intellect in every single thing he did on this court,” England said. “Yet Alan never let the intellectual side of decision-making interfere with his practical common sense.”England said Sundberg could be humble and had a special way of reminding himself that he did not always have all the answers.“With almost every decision this court rendered. . . on the Wednesday before those decision were released. . . he would say to me, ‘How will this play in Perry?’” England recalled. “What he meant by that is: How will this decision be received by the people 50 miles down the street in Perry, Florida? Will it affect their lives? Will it make a difference? Will they even care? And that’s how he worried.”Miami lawyer and longtime Sundberg friend Robert Parks served as Sundberg’s campaign manager for a Supreme Court election in 1976 and remembered an eventful day during the campaign as he was driving Sundberg to the airport in his small sports car.Running late to catch a flight, Parks said the 6-foot-6 justice split his pants “from waist to crotch” when he climbed down into Park’s Datsun 240Z. Not wanting to miss his flight, Sundberg told Parks to “keep driving” as he climbed into the back of the small hatchback to change.“He said, ‘If you don’t get me to the plane on time, your appellate career is history,’” Parks said. To which Parks replied: “If I get stopped going 80 miles an hour with a half-clothed Supreme Court justice in my car, we’re both history.”Sundberg is survived by his wife, Betty Steffens, a lawyer in Tallahassee; his son, William L. Sundberg, also a lawyer in Tallahassee; daughters Allison Lane, La Jolla, Calif.; Angela Estes, Winter Park; and Laura Sundberg, Orlando; a brother, Richard Sundberg of Jacksonville; and eight grandchildren. Another son, Alan Jr., died of skin cancer in 1998.In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions to the Florida Skin Cancer Foundation, 335 Beard St., Tallahassee 32303, or the American Diabetes Association.center_img Lung cancer claims former Chief Justice Alan Sundberglast_img read more

Fleet sets sail as local rents grow

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

MLAX : Syracuse hampered by turnovers in surprising loss to Georgetown

first_img Published on April 21, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_iseman Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img They walked around the field near their sideline slowly and solemnly. Heads down, hands on hips, sticks slamming into the turf, Syracuse’s players appeared pained and dejected. The loss carried a heavy burden, tossing the Orange’s future into doubt and casting a cloud over its final week of the regular season.Syracuse wore the look of a solidly defeated team after a sloppy performance in its 10-8 loss to Georgetown. Toward the end of the day, Syracuse looked fatigued and out of energy.‘I don’t know if it’s the number of games we had in a short period of time, if that came into play,’ SU head coach John Desko said. ‘I don’t know. It’s definitely not the time of year when you want to see the number of turnovers that we had in the game, especially when it’s so important for us today.’A rushed offensive effort led to 22 turnovers. The No. 14 Orange (7-6, 3-2 Big East) couldn’t take care of the ball, and throughout the two-goal loss, SU’s offense simply looked off. It couldn’t create opportunities, failed to find the holes in Georgetown’s zone defense and when the final buzzer signaled the end of the defeat to the Hoyas (6-6, 2-3 Big East) in the Carrier Dome on Saturday, more questions pertaining to Syracuse’s postseason hopes were raised than answers.Despite the loss, Syracuse will be the No. 3 seed in the Big East tournament. The Orange will take on No. 2 seed Villanova in the semifinals in Villanova, Pa., May 3.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe 22 turnovers were the most SU committed since its second game of the season Feb. 26, when it had 25 in a 10-9 win over Army.SU’s second turnover came less than four minutes into the game when Hoyas attack Travis Comeau disrupted a Syracuse clear attempt and scooped up the ground ball as Brian Megill lost it. Comeau took the ball up field and scored to tie the game 1-1.Late in the second quarter, the officials called Syracuse for stalling, and midfielder Henry Schoonmaker stepped out of the box to give GU possession, removing SU’s chances of building on its 3-2 halftime lead.When Georgetown switched into a zone defense, it only grew worse. Aside from the turnovers, the Orange often rushed shots without solid placement.‘We played a lot more zone defense than we have all year, and that wasn’t a bad thing for us to do,’ Georgetown head coach Dave Urick said. ‘It made them work a little bit harder to get the shot that they wanted and take a little bit more time off the clock.’The Hoyas were not efficient with the ball either, finishing the game with 23 turnovers.But as the game progressed, especially late in the third quarter into the fourth – when Georgetown scored four unanswered goals – the Hoyas limited their mistakes.Desko could not pinpoint the reason for his team’s lack of control. The Orange looked fatigued. And Georgetown’s zone defense was also especially effective.For a Syracuse team that averaged 16 goals in its last two contests, this wasn’t one to be proud of.‘I don’t know,’ Desko said. ‘It’s definitely not the time of year when you want to see the number of turnovers that we had in the game, especially when it’s so important for us today.’The Orange only had three turnovers in the fourth quarter, but it hardly ever had the ball. Syracuse won 1-of-8 faceoffs in the final period.Despite that, SU capitalized on its limited opportunities to match Georgetown with four goals. It was the 19 turnovers in the first three quarters that spelled disaster for the Orange.Syracuse has one week to prepare for Notre Dame in what might be the most important game of the season. The Fighting Irish boasts one of the best defenses in the nation. Excess turnovers by SU will likely strip its chances of a win.There’s a cloud of uncertainty hovering over Syracuse and its chances to reach the NCAA tournament, and the Orange has one week to clear it away.‘It’s kind of solemn, it seems like,’ goaltender Bobby Wardwell said. ‘I think we’re going to come out ready to work tomorrow, fight all week and look to get the win against Notre Dame next weekend.’[email protected]last_img read more