TDs to get pay increase in coming months

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Previous articleWeather warning in place for DonegalNext articleCerts now required for importing certain items from Britain to North News Highland Facebook Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th TDs’ salaries are expected to rise above 100,000 euro a year with a pay increase in the next couple of months.The Irish Independent reports a pay rise is expected for top civil servant before July.Currently members of the Dáil are paid a basic salary of over 98,000 euro. By News Highland – February 22, 2021 center_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook Harps come back to win in Waterford Google+ Pinterest TDs to get pay increase in coming months Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

The next step’

first_imgAfter a decades-long push by members of the Notre Dame community for official recognition of a gay-straight alliance (GSA), the University has announced plans for a student organization tasked with providing services and support to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning (GLBTQ) students and their allies. Though this is a historic decision in Notre Dame’s efforts to better serve a diverse student body, University President Fr. John Jenkins said the plan for the unnamed student organization is a natural progression of previous initiatives. “In the 1990s, as I said, we created the Standing Committee [on Gay and Lesbian Student Needs]. In 2006, that was changed to the Core Council [for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Questioning Students], and various initiatives were undertaken in conjunction with those efforts,” he said. “I see this as the next step to be more effective.” The decision comes at the conclusion of a five-month review process commissioned by Jenkins and conducted by the office of Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president for Student Affairs. “[Harding] and her staff have had countless hours [working] extremely hard and have submitted this plan, which I enthusiastically support and accept,” Jenkins said. “It grows out of our mission as a Catholic university, it’s directed by that fundamental mission in a profound way, I think, so I’m enthusiastic about it.” The plan, titled “Beloved Friends and Allies: A Pastoral Plan for the Support and Holistic Development of GLBTQ and Heterosexual Students at the University of Notre Dame,” details the establishment of a “new support and service student organization for GLBTQ students and their allies,” as well as a new advisory committee and the establishment of a full-time student development staff position focused on GLBTQ issues, according to a Dec. 5 University press release. Harding said members of the Notre Dame community should consider more than the establishment of the student organization when evaluating the plan. “The comprehensiveness of this not only being about the organization is a very important element to the entire thing because of the education, because of the awareness, because of the support and interaction with other University offices, we think this is a plan that we believe and hope will be much more than about one organization,” she said. Harding explained the significance of the planned group’s intended status as a student organization rather than a club, a distinction she said is meant to ensure the continuity of the organization over time. “Here at Notre Dame, a club is actually in a sense a temporary structure,” Harding said. “It continues and does programming at the interest of the club itself. So our organizations have more permanence and more stature.” Harding said the status of the planned group as a student organization positions it closer in structure to student government and similar groups than typical student clubs. “The first [distinction] is that it’s part of someone’s full-time job to advise that group, and that provides some of the sustainability and the consistency over time,” she said. This new position will fulfill a number of responsibilities ranging from administrative to advisory. “Underneath all of [these goals], is the support of an individual who we will hire to have this full-time responsibility to work with these structures and with our students on our climate and the Spirit of Inclusion that we all hope to [live by],” Harding said. “That person will play several roles associated with a student organization: to serve as advisor; that person will participate on a new advisory committee that will work with and give input to my office; and lastly, will be responsible for the consistency of the training and the awareness that we build over time.” While the University has greater oversight of organizations than clubs, Harding said organizations have a high level of autonomy. “An organization, like a club, still develops its own constitution and puts in place its own practices, it elects its own leaders,” she said. “But it does have additional input in terms of the approval of that constitution by the University.” Members of the student organization will be free to meet independently, but official matters must be dealt with in the presence of the advisor. “Students will and do meet and discuss organization issues beyond official meetings. Because of the constitutional distinction I mentioned, official business is conducted with the advisor present, who we describe in the [Dec. 5 press] release,” Harding said. “This is consistent with the practices and procedures of our other student organizations on campus.” The timeline for the establishment of this organization will hinge upon the filling of the new position, which Harding estimates will occur early next summer. “Our anticipation is that it is likely the person will not be here full time at the University until July 1, and the reason for that is the cycle of recruiting in the student affairs profession tends to occur in the spring,” she said. As these plans take shape, the new advisory committee will replace the Core Council and take up many of its functions, while incorporating a structure more conducive to performing its intended advisory role. “What’s interesting is the Core Council was started as an advisory committee, and its size reflected that, rather than letting it grow to a programming body,” Harding said. “So its size and composition … I think has limited its ability to grow with the growing needs of campus.” Citing the limits of the Core Council, a group of eight undergraduate students and a number of representatives from her office, Harding said the new advisory council will likely include graduate student representation, as well as staff, faculty and additional administrators. Harding praised the achievements of the Core Council, and said the new advisory committee will maintain and build upon these programs. “There’s been a lot of programs started and launched by the Core Council that have added great value to the University, particularly, I think, when we welcome students to campus for the first time – our first-year students – and training of our hall staff,” she said. “These are programs that can, and should and must be continued.” The road to a decision Harding said the process to develop her office’s proposal to the Office of the President included months of consultation with the various constituencies involved. “The parameter for this solution needed to serve our students well and be grounded fundamentally in our Catholic mission as a University,” she said. “So we’ve spent time with theologians and members, in particular, of our own faculty, who have given us advice on this matter and on Church teaching.” Jenkins said the organization’s roots in Church teaching had a broad practical impact, but these roots are not meant to serve as a basis for limitations the University could theoretically impose on the group. “It’s a rich teaching about the role of sexuality, about intimacy, about human relations, about responsibilities to the community, about relationships to the Church,” Jenkins said. “To put this in a ‘Well you can do this, you can’t do that,’ is to distort the issue.” Once the theological guidelines were defined, Harding said her office tapped the opinion of the constituency most heavily tied to the issue, the student body. “[There were] several groups of students we consulted along the way: first and foremost, students on the Core Council, since it is our structure in place; students who applied for club status; we also spoke with students who were uninvolved particularly with either effort,” she said. “We did two focus groups, one with undergraduate students, one with graduate students, to get their perspective and input on this issue. We consulted with student government, we consulted with a few students who just wrote me along the way.” Harding said her calendar held more than 40 such meetings by the end of the review. Looking outside the community, Harding’s team compared Notre Dame’s existing structures with those of other institutions. “[We] just refreshed some external benchmarking, particularly looking at other Catholic institutions to see the breadths of structures they had in place to serve students who identify as gay or lesbian,” she said. Throughout her office’s review, Harding came to see a commonality amongst many of these sources. “I’ve been struck throughout this process, how whether I’ve been talking to a student, an administrator, a faculty member or leaders in our Church, that we all share a common goal that really speaks back to the Spirit of Inclusion the University adopted many years ago, which is to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment,” she said. With the vast amount of consultation and research conducted by Harding’s office, the final decision came down to Jenkins. “We inform all parties who kind of have a stake in this, of what we’re doing and why we’re doing it. Just as Erin did with the students and graduate students, so I did with members of the Board [of Trustees], but ultimately it was a decision by the President to do this review,” Jenkins said. “[Harding] made a proposal that I accepted on my authority.” Sending a message Despite the challenges of tackling the controversial topic at Notre Dame, Jenkins said he is confident in the plan, which he expects will garner both positive and negative responses. “This is a contested area in society-at-large … whenever an issue like that is present at Notre Dame, it will get attention. I expect some criticism from both people who say – who are on the left and the right – that we’re too far or not far enough,” he said. “Controversy is not necessarily a bad thing. If you avoid controversy, you don’t do anything.” Jenkins said he believes the soundness of the plan will withstand the scrutiny it is bound to receive from concerned parties. “I think if people look carefully at what we’re doing and really, in a thoughtful way, evaluate it, I think thoughtful people will see that this makes sense,” he said. “It makes sense for a Catholic university like Notre Dame to provide such structures to serve their students effectively.” Regardless of potential controversy, Harding said she stands by the plan’s compliance with the University’s mission as well as its ability to better meet students’ needs. “For me to sleep at night, I think about two things. I think first and foremost about the unique mission of this place, and my obligation and my role to serve students,” she said. “I sleep well thinking this is the next step in our evolution as a community. Jenkins said prospective students who truly believe in the University’s mission will likely find value in the plan. “If you look at how graduates of Notre Dame reflect on their experience, one of the things that comes out very strongly is that there is a deep sense of community at Notre Dame, and I think when you read this document, people will see what’s really front and center,” he said. “If people want to be part of that, then this is the place for them.” While Jenkins said expanding the diversity at Notre Dame is part of the administration’s duties, he said the responsibility does not end at the steps of the Main Building. “Diversity isn’t just about having a bunch of different people all in the same place. It really is about building a community,” he said. “As Erin said, we’re not there, we should never feel like we’ve got this down. … It’s my responsibility and Erin’s responsibility to work on this, but it’s everyone’s responsibility.”last_img read more

The Latest: Bengals’ Green, Bucs’ Barrett get franchise tags

first_imgThe Latest: Bengals’ Green, Bucs’ Barrett get franchise tags Sambrailo signed a three-year deal before the 2019 season but played in 13 games only as a backup. The Falcons drafted Kaleb McGary last year to start at right tackle, and Jake Matthews is a fixture at left tackle.___ 12:50 p.m.The Buffalo Bills have announced re-signing offensive lineman Quinton Spain to a three-year contract.The deal with the pending unrestricted free agent was agreed to Thursday. Spain was completing a one-year contract he signed with Buffalo a year ago as part of the team’s major overhaul of its offensive line.Spain is a fifth-year player who started 16 games at left guard and finished with the second-most snaps on offense for the Bills last season. 12:55 p.m.The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have placed their franchise tag on linebacker Shaquil Barrett, who led the NFL in sacks last season.The move had been anticipated ever since coach Bruce Arians stated late last season that the 27-year-old Barrett “ain’t going anywhere” after setting a team record with 19½ sacks in 2019.Barrett signed a one-year, $4 million contract in free agency with the Bucs last winter after spending the first five seasons of his career with the Denver Broncos. The franchise tag for an outside linebacker calls for a salary of about $16 million for 2020.The decision to place the franchise tag on Barrett also means quarterback Jameis Winston will become an unrestricted free agent if Tampa Bay does not re-sign the No. 1 overall pick from the 2015 draft by Wednesday. The Cardinals traded for Drake midway through last season and he quickly became a major part of their offense. The 26-year-old ran for 643 yards and eight touchdowns in eight games, including a four-touchdown game against Cleveland in Week 15.The projected transition tag salary number for a running back is about $10 million, according to overthecap.com.—David Brandt reporting.___12:30 p.m. The New York Giants have placed a non-exclusive franchise tag on defensive tackle Leonard Williams two before the 2015 first-round draft choice was to become an unrestricted free agent.A franchise tag allows the two sides to work on a long-term contract. If there is no contract agreement before July 15, Williams will play this coming season under the one-year deal. His salary will be a calculation based on the average of the top five salaries from his position, expected to be around $16 million.Williams is free to negotiate with other teams when the free agency signing period begins Wednesday. If he signs a contract with another team, the Giants will receive two first-round draft choices as compensation.New York acquired Williams from the Jets for two draft choices on Oct. 29: a third-round selection in 2020 and a second choice that is a conditional fifth-rounder in 2021.Williams is the first Giants player to receive a tag since another defensive lineman, Jason Pierre-Paul, in 2015. Associated Press More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 11:30 a.m.The Cleveland Browns opened free agency by placing a second-round tender on running back Kareem Hunt, who played eight games last season after returning from an NFL suspension.Hunt is a restricted free agent and can negotiate with other teams about a contract. If he reaches an agreement elsewhere, Cleveland can match any offer. If the Browns decide not to match the offer, they would receive a second-round draft pick from the team that signs him.The Browns also released veteran safety Morgan Burnett, creating another need as the team moves into free agency amid nationwide shutdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Burnett suffered a torn Achilles tendon last season and missed the final six games. Winston led the NFL with 5,109 passing yards last season, but also became the first player in league history to throw for at least 30 touchdowns and 30 interceptions in a season.___12:55 p.m.The Patriots have placed a franchise tag on Patriots left guard Joe Thuney, his agent Michael McCartney said in a tweet shortly before the start of the legal tampering period.Thuney, a third-round pick in 2016, has been one of the most dependable pieces on the Patriots’ offensive line over the past four seasons. The nonexclusive tag is expected to cost the Patriots around $14.7 million this upcoming season. The Falcons announced the Sambrailo move on Monday. The team is finalizing the moves with Freeman and Trufant, former Pro Bowl players who had been considered foundation players for the franchise. Financial constraints made the moves necessary.The cuts will clear $12.15 million in salary cap space before Wednesday’s start of free agency. Before the moves, the Falcons ranked 31st in the league with less than $1 million in cap space.Freeman, who celebrated his 28th birthday on Sunday, ran for 656 yards and two touchdowns in 2019. The Falcons ranked only 30th in the league in rushing with 85.1 yards per game and now may look for help at running back in free agency and the NFL draft. Freeman hasn’t played a full season since his second Pro Bowl season in 2016, the last year he ran for at least 1,000 yards. He played in only two games in 2018.The 29-year-old Trufant was a first-round pick in 2013. Trufant started nine games last season before he was placed on injured reserve with a broken forearm. He has 13 interceptions in his seven-year career, including a career-high four last season. Cleveland also tendered exclusive tags to free agents Pharoah Brown, Dontrell Hilliard and KhaDarel Hodge.Hunt was banned from the first eight games last season by the league or two physical altercations while he was with the Kansas City Chiefs. The Cleveland-area native was primarily a blocker for Pro Bowler Nick Chubb, but he rushed for 179 yards and scored two touchdowns. He also caught 37 passes for 285 yards and a TD.With more than $60 million of salary-cap space, Cleveland is expected to be active in free agency, with offensive tackle a priority.—Tom Withers reporting.___ Williams played in eight games with five starts for the Giants. The former Southern California player had 26 tackles, a half-sack, two tackles for loss, 11 quarterback hits, two passes defended and a forced fumble.The Giants also made a qualifying offer to placekicker Aldrick Rosas, a restricted free agent.—Tom Canavan reporting.___11:40 a.m. The person spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the one-year, $11.441 million contract was not finalized. Harris was scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent, after a breakout 2019 season.The Vikings cleared salary-cap space to keep Harris by agreeing to a two-year, $66 million contract extension with quarterback Kirk Cousins that reduced his salary-cap hit for 2020 by $10 million. The Vikings also agreed to a new four-year, $12.25 million contract with fullback C.J. Ham, who was set to be a restricted free agent.— Dave Campbell reporting from Minneapolis ___12:55 p.m.The Atlanta Falcons will dramatically boost their financial flexibility by releasing three high-priced veterans — running back Devonta Freeman, cornerback Desmond Trufant and offensive tackle Ty Sambrailo. Spain’s return assures Buffalo’s offensive line has the potential of returning fully intact.— John Wawrow reporting from Buffalo, New York.___12:40 p.m.The Arizona Cardinals have placed the transition tag on running back Kenyan Drake, which allows the team to match any offer he receives from another team during free agency. The Kansas City Chiefs have placed the nonexclusive franchise tag on Chris Jones, raising the possibility that the Pro Bowl defensive tackle will remain with the Super Bowl champions for at least one more season.The nonexclusive tag means Jones must be offered a one-year contract for no less than the average of the top five salary cap hits at defensive tackle for the previous five years. It also means that if Jones signs an offer sheet from another team, the Chiefs can match that offer or let him go and receive two first-round picks as compensation.Jones had 15 1/5 sacks two seasons ago, which spurred his desire for a long-term deal. He wound up skipping the entire offseason when that didn’t happen, but he returned in time for training camp and started 12 of 13 games. He finished with nine sacks and help the Chiefs win their first Super Bowl title since 1970.—Dave Skretta reporting.___ The Bengals used their franchise tag on A.J. Green, giving them time to try to work out a long-term deal with the star who is one of the most accomplished receivers in franchise history and would be a vital part of breaking in a new quarterback.Green, 31, wants to finish his career in Cincinnati, where he has put down roots. Although he’s open to a multi-year extension that would pay him as an elite receiver, he has objected to staying for only one more season on a franchise designation.Green has said he’ll skip voluntary offseason workouts if he’s tagged. The Bengals are expected to take Heisman Trophy winner Joe Burrow or another quarterback with the first overall pick in the draft, and having Green in offseason workouts would accelerate a rookie’s development.The Bengals are free to negotiate with Green on a long-term deal through July 15.___ If he had hit free agency Thuney was expected to be one of the most sought-after guards on the market. He has not missed a single game and wasn’t whistled for a single penalty in 2019.— Kyle Hightower, reporting from Boston___12:55 p,The Minnesota Vikings have placed the franchise tag on safety Anthony Harris, according to a person with knowledge of the decision. March 16, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditBy The Associated Press (AP) — The Latest on NFL’s free agency. Teams were required to use franchise tags on players by noon EDT Monday. Teams can negotiate with representatives of free agents for the next two days but cannot finalize any agreements. (all times local):___1 p.m.last_img read more

Gold for Jeffrey, Khalil at Senior CASA

first_imgTHERE was a gold rush for Guyana’s Kristian Jeffrey and Jason Ray Khalil as the 2019 Caribbean Area Squash Association (CASA) continued at the Georgetown Club.The duo snapped up gold in the Men’s Doubles competition at the Georgetown Club Squash Courts yesterday.The doubles segment, an inaugural feature of the senior CASA, ensured that Guyana continued to show their dominance on the regional court.The Jeffrey/Khalil combination lost the first set to Barbadian players Khamal Cumberbatch and Shawn Simpson 3-11, but rebounded well to win the remaining games. With limited practice as a unit, the two senior Guyanese flowed well on the court to win 11-8, 11-10.Meanwhile the Women’s pair of Taylor Fernandes and Ashley Khalil lost to their Bajan counterparts, Meagan Best and Amanda Haywood 5-11, 9-11.Strive as they did, they were unable to cope with the fitness of the Bajans – putting up a good fight nonetheless.The tournament continued last evening with the third-place singles playoff which featured the Guyanese pair of Taylor and Mary Fung-a-Fat and the male third-place with saw Richard Chin (Guyana) and Joe Chapman (BVI) clash.Megan Best of Barbados was up against Guyana’s best in Nicolette Fernandes for the female final while Christopher Binnie of Jamaica played Cameron Stafford of the Cayman Islands in the male final.last_img read more