Athletics’ Montas gets more than enough offense to beat Mariners

first_imgOAKLAND — Frankie Montas took the mound Saturday night for the Athletics, and had the full support of his teammates.As usual.Montas improved his record to 9-2, giving up two runs with one walk and nine strikeouts in six innings in an 11-2 win by the Athletics over the Seattle Mariners at the Coliseum before a crowd of 14,846.By the time Yusmeiro Petit took over in the seventh, the Athletics had a nine-run lead. Montas entered the game fifth in the American League in run support with 7.11 …last_img

South African film chosen to air in the US

first_img10 September 2015The South African film, Ayanda and the Mechanic, is one of two acquisitions announced for Ava DuVernay’s African-American Film Festival Releasing Movement.Along with Out of My Hand, the South African film was chosen by the group following its screening at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Ayanda and the Mechanic won the Special Jury Prize in the World Fiction Competition at that festival.The new releases were an initiative to broaden the focus of the organisation and highlight the work of Latino, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern and female filmmakers, the group said.It was founded by DuVernay in 2010 through a collaboration with key black film festivals and arts organisations. The American director, screenwriter, film marketer, and film distributor, was the writer and director of Selma (2014), the acclaimed biopic of Dr Martin Luther King Jr. DuVernay is the first female African American director to have a film nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture.Renamed Array on 8 September, the group will continue to release and champion movies by black filmmakers from the African diaspora, as well as those by women and other filmmakers of colour.Tilane Jones, the group’s executive director, told TheWrap that both these films were terrific. They reflected Array’s broadened scope.Actress Terry Pheto, the co-producer of Ayanda and the Mechanic, said DuVernay had long been a promoter and distributor of black independent films, reported South African newspaper The Citizen. “DuVernay herself recognises this and is proving to be a force to help bring about needed change,’ she said.“She is not only a savvy film marketer and acclaimed director, but also a black woman entrepreneur who is deeply committed to increasing the representation of black people on the big screen.’Pheto played a leading role as Miriam in the 2005 Oscar-winning feature film Tsotsi.So excited to announce that @Ayandamovie has been picked up for US distribution by the incredibly talented @AVAETC! pic.twitter.com/UhdSADfvVm— Terry Pheto (@TerryPheto) September 9, 2015The @Ayandamovie team is beyond grateful to have our film distributed in the US by @AVAETC, @SaraBlecher @News24 http://t.co/U3r0s66SQI— Terry Pheto (@TerryPheto) September 9, 2015Ayanda, the latest film by award-winning director Sara Blecher, is a tale of love, friendship and growth in contemporary South Africa. It opens in local cinemas on 2 October, and is set for release in the US in mid-November.The film has also been screened at prestigious film events such as the Cannes Film Festival.Source: TheWraplast_img read more

U.S., Canadian and Mexican farm groups support modernized NAFTA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), The Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) and Mexico’s Consejo Nacional Agropecuario (CNA) today sent a joint letter to Canadian, United States and Mexican government officials reiterating their calls that NAFTA re-negotiations should aim to modernize the agreement, rather than dismantle it.The AFBF, CFA, and CNA agree that agriculture represents one of NAFTA’s biggest success stories. Agricultural reciprocal trade between the three countries has grown exponentially since the agreement was implemented more than 20 years ago.CFA President Ron Bonnett, strong in his support of the agreement, says that “NAFTA has boosted the incomes of millions of farmers and has facilitated the development of profitable export markets.”In their discussions, the three Presidents agreed on the need to build on the original agreement’s success by looking for ways to increase trade volumes.“When it comes to overall positive results for North America’s farmers and ranchers, NAFTA has proved itself as a solid foundation for trade. Just as farmers have new tools and technology for food and fiber production, we believe that an updated NAFTA agreement can help the three nations become even stronger trading partners,” AFBF President Zippy Duvall said.CNA President Bosco de la Vega, reflecting on the economic benefits of trade, said it is very clear, “The NAFTA agreement has had a positive impact for the agricultural sector, including the exponential increase in trade flows between its partners; currently NAFTA markets are characterized by high level of complementarity, the possibility to face the challenge of food security in a better way, an open trade system with clear and fair rules. Taking these into account, we believe that today the NAFTA members have a big opportunity to even increase this positive outcome.”All parties further commit to meeting with their governments to insist that NAFTA re-negotiations should be built on the principle of “doing no harm.”NAFTA discussions should seek:• Increased and improved regulatory alignment.• Improved flow of goods at border crossings.• Further alignment of sanitary and phytosanitary measures using a science-based approach.• Elimination of non-science based technical barriers to trade.• Revisions that reflect technological advances since implementation such as digital trade, etc.Agriculture industries in each NAFTA country would greatly suffer from disruptions to trading relationships developed over the last 23 years. Farmers have increased productivity and improved their competitiveness to address the rapidly growing demand worldwide for healthy and sustainable food products. Losses due to NAFTA changes would severely stunt this progress.AFBF, CFA and CNA are committed to working with their respective administrations to ensure that a modernized NAFTA continues to be a success story for all farmers.last_img read more

Ohio industry leaders join together to denounce tariff increase

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt Buchenroth, Zach Parrott and Joel PenhorwoodTariffs Hurt the Heartland — the nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs — in conjunction with the Council of the Great Lakes Region, hosted a town hall this week in Cleveland at the 2019 Great Lakes Economic Forum.The event featured a discussion with Ohio business owners, manufacturers and farmers on the impact of tariffs on the state’s economy. The conversation came one day after President Trump announced that he will be increasing tariffs substantially this week.The group released the following statement regarding the tweet announcement that tariffs on $200 billion of goods will increase from 10 to 25% on Friday.“For 10 months, Americans have been paying the full cost of the trade war, not China. To be clear, tariffs are taxes that Americans pay, and this sudden increase with little notice will only punish U.S farmers, businesses and consumers,” Tariffs Hurt the Heartland said in the statement. “If the President follows through on this threat, the consequences will be dire. Raising tariffs to 25% could cost nearly one million American jobs, according to recent estimates. This decision will also roil financial markets and increase the likelihood of retaliation on American farmers who are facing the lowest income levels in years.”A recent study by the non-partisan economic research firm the Trade Partnership found that if tariffs are increased to 25% it would result in 29,100 job losses in Ohio.Tadd Nicholson, executive director of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association, talked with Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood following the meeting.Listen to the full interview here Audio Playerhttps://www.ocj.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/190507_TaddNicholson_TariffsHurtTheHeartland.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“Trade has always been a simple thing in agriculture,” Nicholson said during the group conversation. “We know that we can outcompete in production of food in the world. When there is a tariff coming, that means that there is some form of retaliation. The retaliation will quickly affect agricultural products like soybeans, corn and wheat. If the price of soybean plummets, because of a trade war with China, it causes a overproduction of another product like corn, and low profitability of soybean. The impact is compounded. The livestock industry is also affected, because our corn and soybean goes into the feed of livestock animals. “Agriculture needs a win. We are in a depressed economic state. Any benefit we see in the future will come from trades and exports with other countries.”Agriculture isn’t the only industry seeing hard times in part because of tariffs. The motor industry has recently stepped out with their perspective, especially since Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana lead the way for employment in automobile manufacturing.“Twenty percent of employment has grown in the midwest, because of vehicle manufacturing and production has grown, as well as investments from the suppliers,” said Ann Wilson, senior vice president, Government Affairs, Motor, and Equipment Manufacturers Association. “Steel and aluminum tariffs raise the price of domestic steel and aluminum has increased 50% from last year. Most developers are small manufacturers. They have to pay more for their inputs of steel. President Trump has a study on his desk, that has not been made public that could put a 25% tariff on all imported automobile parts. Companies like O’Reilly and NAPA are not investing in the United States, including Ohio, because of the uncertainty whether or not they can make imports. Employment will decrease and consumer prices will increase.”The beverages industry has also seen some troubling results, according to Cleveland Whiskey founder and CEO Tom Lix.“In 2017, 15% of business came from exports to the UK, they were predicted to go up to 20% by 2018. By 2018 there was not a single bottle of Cleveland Whiskey sold in Europe. The tariff causes the prices on the whiskey to be marked up. The tariff caused the whiskey prices to be increased by 50%. Cleveland Whiskey had to fire two employees, because they could not afford to have them,” Lix said. “We buy things from around the world everyday and it is crazy to me that we aren’t encouraging those kinds of trades. The fact that we are manipulating these trade deals and using it as a political tool is absolutely absurd, and it hurts a whole lot of people. Mark my words, the economy won’t stay this good forever. We are making things worse for ourselves.”The group was also joined by Ed Brzytwa, director of international trade for the American Chemistry Council as well as Mark Fisher of the Council of the Great Lakes Region and Farmers for Free Trade co-founder Angela Marshall Hofmann.last_img read more