Mack sweeps Fortuna in non-league game

first_imgFortuna >> The first set of the volleyball match between McKinleyville and Fortuna set the tone for what would be an all out battle to the end.Both teams fought hard throughout the match but it was McKinleyville that earned the win in three straight sets, 25-22, 25-22 and 25-13 on Thursday at Fortuna High School.Katherine Howard led the Panthers with 10 assists along with four aces. Mya Alves added eight kills and nine assists for Mack. Abby Miller had six kills along with three blocks and …last_img

South African film chosen to air in the US

first_img10 September 2015The South African film, Ayanda and the Mechanic, is one of two acquisitions announced for Ava DuVernay’s African-American Film Festival Releasing Movement.Along with Out of My Hand, the South African film was chosen by the group following its screening at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Ayanda and the Mechanic won the Special Jury Prize in the World Fiction Competition at that festival.The new releases were an initiative to broaden the focus of the organisation and highlight the work of Latino, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern and female filmmakers, the group said.It was founded by DuVernay in 2010 through a collaboration with key black film festivals and arts organisations. The American director, screenwriter, film marketer, and film distributor, was the writer and director of Selma (2014), the acclaimed biopic of Dr Martin Luther King Jr. DuVernay is the first female African American director to have a film nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture.Renamed Array on 8 September, the group will continue to release and champion movies by black filmmakers from the African diaspora, as well as those by women and other filmmakers of colour.Tilane Jones, the group’s executive director, told TheWrap that both these films were terrific. They reflected Array’s broadened scope.Actress Terry Pheto, the co-producer of Ayanda and the Mechanic, said DuVernay had long been a promoter and distributor of black independent films, reported South African newspaper The Citizen. “DuVernay herself recognises this and is proving to be a force to help bring about needed change,’ she said.“She is not only a savvy film marketer and acclaimed director, but also a black woman entrepreneur who is deeply committed to increasing the representation of black people on the big screen.’Pheto played a leading role as Miriam in the 2005 Oscar-winning feature film Tsotsi.So excited to announce that @Ayandamovie has been picked up for US distribution by the incredibly talented @AVAETC! pic.twitter.com/UhdSADfvVm— Terry Pheto (@TerryPheto) September 9, 2015The @Ayandamovie team is beyond grateful to have our film distributed in the US by @AVAETC, @SaraBlecher @News24 http://t.co/U3r0s66SQI— Terry Pheto (@TerryPheto) September 9, 2015Ayanda, the latest film by award-winning director Sara Blecher, is a tale of love, friendship and growth in contemporary South Africa. It opens in local cinemas on 2 October, and is set for release in the US in mid-November.The film has also been screened at prestigious film events such as the Cannes Film Festival.Source: TheWraplast_img read more

Did you Say Something, Honey? A Look at Distracted Parenting

first_imgBy: David Lee Sexton, Jr. and Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFTPexels[Woman by ViktorHanacek.cz on Nov. 4, 2014, CC0]“Mom!! Can you PLEASE put your phone down and pay attention to me for just a minute? I need your help.”Ouch. That stings. I wish I could tell you that this was the one and only time my 8-year-old son has called me out on the overuse of my phone or other electronics while he has so frustratingly (for him) attempted to get my attention. But, if I told you that, I wouldn’t be telling the truth.  I have found myself in this shameful situation more than I prefer to acknowledge. But, I know I am not alone. And, while I know that I am a good mother, I also admit that I have fallen into the category of sometimes being a distracted parent.We’ve all heard the stories: a busy parent, a child momentarily forgotten in a hot car resulting in a dangerous and potentially horrific situation. According to the Washington Post, death by hyperthermia is the official term for the tragic outcome of distracted parents leaving behind children in parked cars due to distraction, a change in routine, or an unusual amount or type of stress (Weingarten, 2009). Although this occurs about 15 to 25 times per year in the US, it is but an extreme example of the risks of distracted parenting (Weingarten, 2009).Worthen (2012) indicates that there is a possible connection between device (such as mobile phone) distraction and child injuries. In the age of fast-paced technology growth, trends indicate a change of direction in the rates of child injuries; according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2007 and 2010, nonfatal injuries to children under the age of five increased by 12%, a rapid incline compared to declining rates during the prior decade (Worthen 2012).Meanwhile, phone ownership for Americans 13 and older has increased from 9 million (coinciding with the release of the iPhone in 2007) to 114 million in 2012 (Worthen, 2012). Worthen notes that this connection is merely correlational and points out the difficulty in identifying direct causality due to issues with collecting the appropriate data, such as unlikelihood of parents to self-report their use of a mobile device during the time of their child’s injury. However, research has examined other factors that may emphasize the overall negative outcomes of distracted parenting.McDaniel and Radesky (2017) examine the relationship between distracted parenting caused by interferences (known in the literature as technoference) in parent-child interactions and the externalizing and internalizing of behavior by children. Examples of internalizing behavior are represented by sulking, whining, and easily hurt feelings while externalizing behavior may look like restlessness, an inability to sit still, or proneness to temper tantrums. Interestingly, McDaniel and Radesky found support for the relationship between technoference and both externalized and internalized behaviors of children, reported by both mothers and fathers. However, this result was only found in mother-child interactions. In contrast, father-child interactions did not predict externalizing and internalizing. McDaniel and Radesky offer two compelling explanations for this discrepancy. First, it is possible that children respond differently to maternal and paternal interactions. However,  perhaps the most plausible explanation comes from sample characteristics, as 30% of mothers in the sample worked 30+ hours per week in contrast to 82% of fathers. As such, the fathers in the study sample may have simply had fewer opportunities to interact with their children.While the literature highlighted above is just a mere sampling of research on the topic of distracted parenting, it certainly elicits the question of how technology use is impacting parenting and parent-child interaction. I can see from my own home, how my distracted parenting impacts the behavior of my children and the interactions I have with them.  I can also see it with other parents and their children when we are at the park, at a restaurant, and at a grocery store. So, what does all of this mean? It means that we may need to all take a closer look at our own personal experience with distracted parenting and figure out what works best for our families. It is possible to find that happy medium between the use of technology and non-distracted parenting. The goal is just finding that ‘sweet spot’ within your own household.How do YOU find your ‘sweet spot’? Tell us in the comments below what you do to mitigate your own distracted parenting and what works for you and your family!ReferencesMcDaniel, B. T. & Radesky, J. S. (2017). Technoference: Parent distraction with technology and associations with child behavior problems. Child Development, https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12822Weingarten, G. (2009, March 8). Fatal distraction: Forgetting a child in the backseat of a car is a horrifying mistake. Is it a crime? The Washington Post, p. W08. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/fatal-distraction-forgetting-a-child-in-thebackseat-of-a-car-is-a-horrifying-mistake-is-it-a-crime/2014/06/16/8ae0fe3a-f580-11e3-a3a5-42be35962a52_story.html?utm_term=.f8362a52169bWorthen, B. (2012, September 29). The perils of texting while parenting. The Wall Street Journal, p. C1. Retrieved from http://members.aon.at/emarsale/deutsch/Perils_of_texting.pdfThis blog was written by Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFT and David Lee Sexton, Jr, members of the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more