I’ve tried to copy Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses: Riyan Parag

first_img17-year-old batsman Riyan Parag, who rose to fame after he helped Rajasthan Royals beat Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) in one of their fixtures in the recently concluded Indian Premier League (IPL), has admitted he admires leading woman batter Smriti Mandhana and tries to copy her style of batting.Mandhana is among the few batters Parag admires and takes inspiration from.”My dad is one of them (idols). He has to be the first one. Then there’s Sachin (Tendulkar) sir and Virat Kohli. And in women’s cricket, I’ve followed Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses and play with a BAS bat. I was really young then. I love the way she times the ball and caresses it through point. I’ve tried copying that as well but it didn’t work out,” Parag said on the sidelines Red Bull Campus Cricket event in Jaipur.Perhaps, Parag is one of the few male cricketers who admit of being an ardent fan of women cricketers.He also revealed his experience of playing in the IPL. “I have learnt a lot from my first IPL stint. In IPL, you play with your idols and legends of the game. Just to share the dressing room was surreal,” Parag said.He further said that he doesn’t like to bat in the nets as he feels ‘locked’. “Actually, I hate batting in the nets. It’s just the closed environment. I feel someone has got a hold of me and I am like captured and locked.””Even before the matches, I try to hit as many sixes as possible,” he added.advertisementWhen quizzed about his most challenging moment from this year’s IPL, Parag said: “The time I felt really nervous this season was before the match against Kolkata Knight Riders. I don’t have a great record at the Eden Gardens. Before the KKR game, I’d scored nine runs in each of the three innings I’d played there. So the knock I played that day is the most special one for me this season. I feel pressure brings out my A-game,” he said.In that match, Rajasthan Royals were in serious trouble chasing 176 but Parag (47 off 31 balls) first joined forces with Shreyas Gopal and then with Jofra Archer to leave KKR fans at the Eden Gardens stunned.When asked if he reads about the comments made on social media about him, Parag said, “Yes, I do. I had this conversation with Ben Stokes after the Mumbai Indians match this season, where I did well and contributed with the bat. I asked him if he reads comments online and he said that he does no matter how he performed on the field that day.”You can’t really hide from that. If you post something on Instagram, people are going to tell you things to your face. And you’re bound to read those comments. But like I said, it’s all about keeping things simple and not thinking about it too much,” he added.Also Read | Playing for India my goal, says Riyan Parag after impressive IPL 2019Also Read | Riyan Parag to Alzarri Joseph: Youngsters who brought IPL 2019 alivelast_img read more

Stomach issues signal future mental problems

first_imgChildren who face adversities – such as parental separation – are more likely to suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms which may lead to mental health issues in later life, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Development and Psychopathology, found that gastrointestinal symptoms in children may have an impact on the brain and behaviour as they grow to maturity. “One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints,” said Nim Tottenham, a professor at Columbia University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Tottenham. Scientists have long noted the strong connection between the gut and brain. Previous research has demonstrated that a history of trauma or abuse has been reported in up to half of adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), at a prevalence twice that of patients without IBS. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”The role of trauma in increasing vulnerability to both gastrointestinal and mental health symptoms is well established in adults but rarely studied in childhood,” said Bridget Callaghan, a post-doctoral research fellow at Columbia. Animal studies have demonstrated that adversity-induced changes in the gut microbiome influence neurological development, but no human studies have done so. “Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health.” The researchers focused on development in children who experienced extreme psychosocial deprivation due to institutional care before international adoption. Separation of a child from a parent is known to be a powerful predictor of mental health issues in humans. That experience, when modelled in rodents, induces fear and anxiety, hinders neurodevelopment and alters microbial communities across the lifespan. The researchers drew upon data from 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care on or before approximately they were two years old, and from 229 children raised by a biological caregiver. The children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms that included stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea. From that sample of adoptees, the researchers then selected eight participants, ages seven to 13, from the adversity exposed group and another eight who’d been in the group raised by their biological parents. The children with a history of early caregiving disruptions had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth. Brain scans of all the children also showed that brain activity patterns were correlated with certain bacteria. “It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.last_img read more