The Evolution of Spite

first_img(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Since everything evolves, according to consensus science, why not attitudes like spite?  The BBC News reported about a University College London study on attitudes of revenge between the sexes.  They found that men seemed to get more satisfaction out of hurting foes than women.  This is all part of an evolutionary explanation for altruistic behavior in humans.  According to lead researcher Dr. Tania Singer, “evolution has probably seeded this sense of justice and moral duty into our brains.”    Where a sense of revenge came from seems a puzzle, however, from an evolutionary viewpoint, because apparently apes don’t have it.  In another press release from the Max Planck Society, chimpanzees exhibit neither altruism nor spite.  Researchers put chimpanzees in a cage with levers that could either deliver a treat equally easily to another chimpanzee in another room, or to an empty room.  The scientists were surprised that the chimps seemed to have no preference for either choice.  “Contrary to initial expectations the chimpanzees behaved neither altruistic nor spiteful,” the press release stated.  “According to the researchers, both characteristics therefore seem to be human-specific.”  Humans give blood and give to charities for people they don’t even know.  “This kind of altruism has never been demonstrated in any other animal except for humans and some believe it is one of the characteristics that makes us human,” the article continued.  The evolutionary explanation for this was given as follows:If altruism and spite are unique to humans and are not present in chimpanzees, then it is likely [sic] that these characteristics have arisen in the last 6 million years [sic] since humans and chimpanzees shared a common ancestor [sic].  Humans’ intense regard for each other, either positive or negative, may have made an important contribution to our ability to cooperate, our sense of fairness, and the morality that defines today’s society. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Presumably this explains the Israeli-Iran controversy, discussions about earmarking on Congressional bills, and what to do about terrorism.Only an evolutionist can take negative evidence and give it a positive spin.  Only an evolutionist can take moral evil and turn it into brain chemistry.  Only an evolutionist can speak of morality and altruism while denying the definitions of the words.  Should evolutionists be able to get away with presenting these ideas as the only permissible scientific explanations in public schools?last_img read more

UWC takes the lead in physics research

first_imgA team of students from the University of Western Cape (UWC), led by Professor Nico Orce, is the first African research team to lead an experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).The day when the shosholoza was sung inside the heart of CERN! (Image: Nico Orce)Sulaiman PhilipBetter known as the home of the Large Hadron Collider, CERN is one of the most prestigious science research facilities in the world. It attracts the crème de la crème of international researchers, and now a team from UWC has joined their ranks.Led by the university’s Professor Nico Orce, the team of postgraduate students fired a selenium beam into a platinum target. The idea was to smash two nuclei into each other in the hope of causing an excitation in the selenium isotope.Selenium 70 lives for about 42 minutes and is produced during x-ray bursts, most commonly found in the stellar explosions of neutron stars. The new research facility at CERN, the Isotope Separator On-Line facility (ISOLDE), has an unstable selenium beam that is necessary for the experiments the UWC team is undertaking.UWC PhD student Kenzo Abrahams at CERN setting up the experiment. (Image: Nico Orce)South Africa joined the Isolde Collaboration — an agreement between nations and CERN to conduct experiments in the fields of nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, materials science and life sciences — in 2017. This allows the country to benefit from ISOLDE’s beams of unstable exotic particles, such as selenium 70 and germanium 66.Orce explains: “So far, we can only accelerate stable beams at iThemba LABS, so we needed to go to CERN to complete these experiments. Soon enough we may be doing these kinds of measurements for the first time at iThemba LABS, here in South Africa. That will be great.”At the South African facility, in Somerset West, scientists in the physical, medical and biologial sciences undertake research for advanced education, the treatment of cancers and the production of unique radioisotopes.The goal of the UWC experiment was to discover how unstable exotic elements were created. “Above iron ore we do not know how elements are produced. Question marks still remain over how these elements are created,” says the professor.The team’s experiments did not produce the results for which they had hoped; however, instead of selenium 70, they were able to measure the creation of a different exotic particle, germanium 66. “We can still say we were successful. It’s the first time that germanium 66 was produced on Earth. We were able to study the decay of germanium 66 until we find a stable isotope.”Science, Orce says, “is like fighting Mike Tyson. You jab and jab until you can land a clean shot.”The small peak on the right is the first excitation in 66Ge. Evidence of the UWC teams success. (Image: Nico Orce)The benefits to UWC and the countryTo encourage his students to reach for the stars, Orce, a Spaniard, uses the experience of the Spanish team that won the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The team that arrived in the country were underdogs. “We made history because we believed in ourselves. Afterwards the team were feared, respected.”The physics postgraduate programme at UWC consists of 50 previously disadvantaged students. It attracts, Orce says, not necessarily the best students but they all dream of lifting themselves up. To encourage their dreams he insisted that the best of his students were part of his research team.“I wanted them to know that dreams come true if you work hard. I believe that having them work with the best scientists will show them the world beyond their own circumstances. It was life changing. Some of these students will be professors one day.”In an interview with the CERN newsletter, Master’s student Senamile Masango said: “I am a role model now. You will hardly find any women doing physics in South Africa, and you will hardly find any black physicists. Nico treats us all equally and he’s making us hungry to break every barrier. We’re making history.”As the lead research team, the UWC students and their professor were responsible for setting parameters and monitoring controls. Team member Sifiso Ntshangase was team leader, which gives him the opportunity to suggest further experiments that can be conducted at CERN. “There is a responsibility that goes along with being the first African team, of being from UWC. We will keep proposing new experiments; we want to go back.”Going back is not simply a matter of proposing innovative experiments, however. To run the facilities at CERN is expensive. Orce explains: “To get beam time is not easy, or cheap. It costs €100,000 (R1.5-million) per day. We have to thank the Department of Science and Technology for helping to make our trip possible.”It was important that the team from UWC led the research, he adds. Now that the experiment is completed, teams from UWC and their research partners at the University of York in the UK will analyse the data before publishing results in scientific journals. “We will be lead authors. This will impact on the quality of visiting professors we can attract. Already we have leading nuclear physicists interested in doing a sabbatical at the university.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

NBA and players’ union pushing for wearable tech on the court

first_imgInternet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puck Tags:#Internet of Things#IoT#Motus#NBA#wearables center_img Ryan Matthew Pierson Related Posts Reports out of the tentative negotiations for the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) between the NBA and players union indicate that a wearables committee is set to be formed. This committee made up of NBA officials and representatives of the players will determine how and where wearable technology will be used to track and record player biometric data.This move is intended to reduce the number of injuries and overexertion issues that players experience throughout the season. Playing your best players throughout most of the game is a good idea on paper. After all, shouldn’t you put the players that score the most in the game?In practice, this doesn’t work out very well at all. As the season goes on, prolonged exertion and intense workloads take a toll on the players. Top names like LeBron James and Kyrie Irving end up sitting out key games to rest. If there was a way to track these player’s exertion levels, the coaches would be able to better manage the team’s time in the game in order to improve player longevity.What about long-term player health?Another important factor to consider is long-term player health. In a recent report in Undefeated, the Retired Players Association is discussing additional screening for retirees after a series of deaths involving young former professional players.As of right now, biometric trackers are banned in the NBA as part of its equipment regulations. However, this committee would enable players’ representatives to work out a new agreement to enable their use in the court.This data would provide a valuable insight to players, their trainers, and their medical team(s). This technology is already approved for Major League Baseball players. These teams use a system called Motus.Meanwhile, the NBA, NHL, and NFL continue to ban these devices during games… for now.last_img read more

India’s Test pacers bound for South Africa tour set to play Ranji Trophy semi-finals

first_imgVirat Kohli has been rested for India’s limited-overs matches against Sri Lanka while Hardik Pandya opted out of the Test series against Sri Lanka. However, there was no such break for India’s Test specialists bound for South Africa later this month.Kohli and Pandya, have of course, shared far greater workload than the Test specialists. The India captain has been the busiest cricketer in the world while Pandya, who debuted in 2016, has been a constant for Indian teams in all three formats in 2017.In what could be a wise move, BCCI decided to keep India’s Test players match-ready for the first Test against South Africa which begins in Cape Town on January 5.The Indian board decided to allow the likes of Ishant Sharma, Mohammed Shami, Umesh Yadav to turn up for their respective states in the Ranji Trophy semi-final from December 17-21. Bengal will be playing Delhi in Pune in the first semi-final while Karnataka will take on Vidarbha in the second semi-final.”Shami and Wriddhiman Saha will turn up for Bengal while Ishant Sharma might turn up for Delhi. Umesh Yadav will get to play for Vidarbha against Karnataka which will have KL Rahul in their ranks. Since there aren’t any practice games in South Africa, it is only fair that they play Ranji Trophy,” a senior BCCI official told PTI on Wednesday.It is learnt that the national selectors also wanted the Test specialists to play the semi-final.When asked CAB joint secretary Avishek Dalmiya said: “Yes, Shami and Wriddhi will be playing for Bengal. It has been a good move by BCCI to allow the top stars take part in a marquee match. Ranji Trophy is the premier tournament and at a stage like semi-final, it will be a boost for the Bengal team to get two of its senior most players,” Dalmiya said.advertisementHowever when contacted, a senior DDCA official said that there is still no clarity whether Ishant will be available for the match.Ishant, who has captained the side impressively at the group league stage also bowled brilliantly taking 20 wickets in four games.The final is set to be played at the Holkar Stadium in Indore from December 29.  (With inputs from PTI)last_img read more

Police chase in San Diego ends in Escondido on I15

first_img Updated: 12:02 PM Police chase in San Diego ends in Escondido on I-15 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) –A motorist who fled a traffic stop in Encanto Tuesday led officers on a 40-minute pursuit that ended with his arrest near Lake Hodges, authorities reported.The man refused to yield when San Diego police tried to pull him over for a traffic violation in the 6800 block of Akins Avenue shortly after 9 a.m., SDPD public-affairs Officer Michael Stirk said.The motorist drove off to the east toward Spring Valley, then entered state Route 125 and headed north, Stirk said.Reaching Santee, the man entered SR-52 and headed west, then merged onto northbound Interstate 15 when he got to the Miramar area.While passing through northern San Diego with SDPD and California Highway Patrol personnel tailing him and tracking his pursuit aboard a police helicopter, the driver managed to avoid running over several spike strips that CHP officers hurled onto the roadway in his path.After entering Escondido, however, the man finally pulled to a stop on the side of the freeway near Ninth Avenue and was taken into custody without further incident about 9:45 a.m., Stirk said.The arrestee’s name was not immediately available. Mike McKinnon III Posted: March 5, 2019center_img Mike McKinnon III, March 5, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitterlast_img read more