Red and Yellow investment reaps rewards

first_imgRed and Yellow’s mission is to counter the increasing income gap by arming underprivileged people with the knowledge and skills they need to compete with their affluent counterparts on even ground. This is done through facilitating this learnership. (Image: Red & Yellow)It started almost a year ago, when 30 promising, young and hungry people from previously disadvantaged backgrounds were chosen to take part in the first advertising certificate course run by Red & Yellow School in Johannesburg.The first course run by the advertising and marketing college took place at the institution’s main campus in Cape Town in 2015.Chosen from some 3 000 applicants, the 30 students were given a chance to prove themselves and become part of the future of South Africa’s marketing and advertising industry through the Red &Yellow Springboard Marketing Institute (RYSMI).The RYSMI learnership involves six months of training at the school, after which the students are placed in various companies in the industry for a further six months. There they get on-the-job experience and training, giving them a proper taste of life in advertising and marketing.Today, almost a year later, the students are in their last days of their course and their time at their respective companies and agencies. When their learnerships do end, the students will go back to Red & Yellow, where they will prepare to write their final exams.Putting on paper what they learned in the classroom and in the industry, this last step will reveal whether they have what it takes to break into the sector successfully.Red and Yellow’s mission is to counter the increasing income gap by arming underprivileged people with the knowledge and skills they need to compete with their affluent counterparts on even ground. This is done through facilitating this learnership.Commenting on what it took to be successful in advertising and marketing, Matome Malatji (pictured above) said that “most importantly it is centred on how you think.”A PERSONAL ACCOUNTMatome Malatji, one of the 30 students, was placed at Avatar Agency. Speaking of his experiences over the better part of the last six months, he said: “At Avatar Agency, for the first time, I was in a place where I understood people and they understood me right back.“At Avatar I learned about the agency and the industry as a whole; how the departments and the different people and personalities in those departments worked as a unit. This experience helped me put all that I had learned during the first six months of the learnership into practice.”His time at the agency gave him a chance to get to grips with what exactly went on in the day-to-day running of an agency and how individual agencies existed in the competitive field of advertising.“Everybody wants to be heard. With the hands-on experience I had at Avatar and the lessons I was taught at Red & Yellow, I believe I have found my voice to have my say in this ever-changing industry, which has its own culture and lifestyle.”Commenting on what it took to be successful in advertising and marketing, Malatji said that “most importantly it is centred on how you think. I will carry with me everything I have learned and my now not-so-little black book.”GET INVOLVEDThe Red & Yellow certificate course accepts a new group of ambitious students each year to continue the school’s search for promising talent and those who will help to take the South African advertising and marketing industry to new heights.If you want to be considered for the programme, more details are available on the Red &Yellow Springboard Marketing Institute website. You can also get in touch with Melissa Maguire via email on [email protected] or call 011 067 3400.“All’s well that ends well,” said Malatji. “You never know what you’re capable of until you try.”last_img read more

Ohio Crop Progress – Planting Nearly Complete

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dry weather brought opportunities for producers to get back into the fields and get some planting done, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 4.6 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending June 4th. Southern Ohio was the driest while Northeast Ohio got the most rain. Conditions reduced soil moisture surpluses, but some remaining saturated fields, and needs for replanting delayed the completion of corn planting. Corn condition is mostly fair to good, but warm temperatures and opportunities for side dressing is expected to give the crop a boost. Despite dryer conditions producers are still behind on first cutting of hay.View the latest Crop Progress Report for Ohio herelast_img read more

Making time for history on an Ohio Century Farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseGrandkids interested in a treasure hunt, a grim prostate cancer diagnosis and a farmer with a long family history on the land — in 2016 it was time.Though he had been putting it off for years because there was always something more pressing, Rick Crawford finally decided that it was time to plod up the steps of the deteriorating old house on his family’s Adams County farm to investigate the old trunks filled with unknown farm history from generations gone by. They discovered the old house was full of critters and family memories.“To the best of my knowledge when Robert Richard — my great-great grandfather — moved here in 1875, that old log cabin was already here. When I was 7, my great grandfather died in 1960 and he was the last family member to live there. After that we rented it out. I was in and out of it after that when we were renting it, but I don’t think the tenants ever went upstairs. After they moved out, it just sat there and deteriorated. I knew there were things we probably should get out of there,” Rick said. “I always wondered what was in those trunks upstairs. I thought, ‘If I don’t do it, maybe nobody ever will.’”It was a fairly mild winter day and the Crawford grandchildren were really increasing the pressure to go explore the old house to search for treasures, so they did. That day, three living generations got a glimpse into the previous four generations of ancestors who farmed the land before them.“As we dug through it, it was interesting to see the history we were finding. We found the original paper with a wax seal on it from Samuel Crawford, who was the first family member we know about in Ohio. He came from Ireland to the U.S. in 1817, spent some time in Pennsylvania and Virginia and then came down the Ohio River to Adams County in 1825. He would have been my great-great-great grandfather. He was granted citizenship by one of the judges here in the County. We found letters from the Civil War, Christmas cards, bills, receipts, and tax documents — they made something like $500 in a whole year,” Rick said. “The grandkids enjoyed it and I was able to connect names and parcels of property here on the farm and better connect with my ancestors by doing that. I felt a connection I’d never had before. Some letters from the Civil War were still in the original envelopes. You can learn about the Civil War and go to Gettysburg, but this was actually my family members who were involved.”That mild winter day spent in the very old house got Rick started in the process of working to preserve some of the farm’s history through the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Ohio Historic Family Farms Program.“Having those letters and the original deeds kind of inspired me,” Rick said. “I didn’t realize all of the family we had and this helped me put it all together.”The first known parcel owned by the family was in timber at the time Samuel Crawford’s son Andrew purchased it in 1867, though it appears that the family may have owned adjacent properties even earlier. After this purchase, Andrew bought additional land and raised cattle, hogs, tobacco, wheat and hay.Andrew’s brother Robert Richard had two sons who fought and died in the Civil War, as described in the letters discovered in the old log cabin. Robert Richard had a total of 18 children. He had 12 children with his first wife, who passed away during childbirth with twins in 1860, and six more children with his second wife.Another son of Samuel served as First Lieutenant of Co. D in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry from July 25, 1862 through Oct. 11, 1864. He also purchased property now part of Crawford farms. Elza Mannering Crawford, born in 1873, was the last family member to live in the old log cabin that the Rick remembers as a child. Elza and his son, Albert, pushed for building the road that now runs to the farm to better connect with the outside world.“When the first family members came here there was an old horse and buggy road. You can still see traces of that road on our property. To get to town my great grandfather would ride a horse down through the woods to the Model T and they’d get back in the pitch dark and the horse would know how to get back through the woods in the dark,” Rick said. “They decided to pay for the survey and do the leg work to get a road put in on the high ground and it was first called Ellison Ridge Road. Back in the 60s the county took the road over and they changed it to Crawford Road because my grandfather played such a big part in getting this road here.”Albert’s son, Delbert Wayne Crawford, was Rick’s father.“My dad milked cows when I was young. It was grade C milk and we’d lift the milk cans into a cooler and the milkman would come and get the cans every other day. All the hay then was square bales. It seemed like the weather was better then and we would work four weeks straight baling hay every day in the summer and we can’t do that anymore. It seems like if we get one day of work in every week we are flying any more,” Rick said. “We always raised a little wheat, corn and hay. The corn was always ear picked. My father would tell us about the first tractor, I believe an 8N Ford, and when electricity came in 1948.“As I got near the age of graduating from high school and I wasn’t there to help with the hay, dad bought a round baler. Now we have evolved with the hay and we do it mechanized with an accumulator that goes behind a nearly new square baler and it’s got a preservative applicator and everything on it. Then we pick up 10 bales at a time and if everything is working right, we never touch a bale of hay. We still have a good many round bales we make and we are doing most of it from the seat of a tractor these days.”Today Rick and his son, Sam — there is a Samuel in every generation of Crawfords on the farm — raise around 150 acres of hay that is mostly sold to the local Amish community and they grow just enough corn to feed their stocker cattle and the deer for the hunting business on the farm’s 720 acres that was started to replace tobacco income for the farm. Tobacco was grown all of the years the Crawford family has been on the farm until 2005.“The tobacco companies were wanting bigger producers. We were growing 7 to 11 acres and that could produce 20,000 to 24,000 pounds of tobacco. That requires a lot of labor. I was wanting to downsize and the companies wanted me to raise more,” Crawford said. “We decided to quit raising tobacco and I ran into a guy in town who was leasing out rights for deer hunting. I had never heard of that before then. Now we sell six-day archery hunts and the lodging, up to 10 hunts a year.”Plenty has changed for the Crawford family farm since 1867, but thanks to that winter day in 2016 when Rick and his family took the time to peer into the past, a connection to the farm’s history was re-established.“I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and I may not be around all that much longer. I don’t feel like I own these deeds. I am just the current caretaker. Nobody owns the property, but the tax bill changes addresses every 20 or 30 years,” Rick said. “As I was researching all of this, I wished I would have done this a few years earlier when my dad was alive. He lived and breathed this farm. He never had a job a day in his life and he was never out of work. I think my dad would have been really interested in this.”In 2016, it was time. And, as it turns out, it was time well spent.Kristy, Sam, Rick and Patty Crawford stand along side of Crawford Road that runs through their farm in Adams County.last_img read more

2 days agoNailed it? Tottenham boss Pochettino explains sluggish form

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Nailed it? Tottenham boss Pochettino explains sluggish formby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino says a late start to preseason has hindered his side this term.Spurs snapped a three-game winless streak with an emphatic 5-0 win over Red Star Belgrade in North London on Tuesday.Asked if there had been an overreaction to Spurs’ poor form, the Argentine provided an excuse for their poor start to the season.Pochettino said: “My theory is we started late in our preparation. We used pre-season not just to settle our principles of play and build fitness, but also to build a dynamic of the group and I believe that was affected because we started so late (due playing in the Champions League final).”During competition to get that dynamic right is so difficult because the competition does not wait for you.”The most important thing is to stay calm and believe.” last_img read more

JCF to Provide Adequate Security During Busy Shopping Season

first_img “We are reducing our administrative deployment and putting more persons into operational deployment, so what you will find now is that there will be an increase in the number of officers…. on our streets to ensure that everybody has a safe Christmas,” he said. Story Highlights The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is assuring that adequate security will be provided in major commercial areas during the festive season to ensure public safety.Speaking with JIS News, Communications Officer, JCF’s Corporate Communications Unit, Sergeant Shaunjay Mitchell, says additional personnel have been deployed to reinforce security in the areas.“We are reducing our administrative deployment and putting more persons into operational deployment, so what you will find now is that there will be an increase in the number of officers…. on our streets to ensure that everybody has a safe Christmas,” he said.In addition, Sergeant Mitchell is encouraging Jamaicans to reduce the number of jewellery they wear and amount of cash they travel with by using credit or debit cards where possible.“In order to minimise your risk of being robbed or of you losing that cash by way of somebody picking your pocket or removing it from your wallet or purse, we advise that you walk with less cash. Avoid big handbags or bulky wallets or purses,” he said.He noted that persons should monitor their bank cards while conducting transactions, so that persons do not clone or duplicate the cards. “You must always be able to see what that merchant is doing to your credit (or debit) card,” he said.Sergeant Mitchell further advised that persons should use automated teller machines (ATMs) that are heavily trafficked.“Avoid using ATMs in dark lonely places…use ATMs within areas where a lot of persons tend to use, and use ATMs in public spaces where you have a lot of traffic. Once you get inside the ATM, ensure that you bolt the door behind you,” he said.He further encouraged persons to examine the machines to ensure that duplicate keypads are not placed on the legitimate ones.Meanwhile, Sergeant Mitchell is urging drivers to exercise patience on the road, while obeying the road codes and regulations.He urged persons to be alert of their surroundings, adding that if they believe they are being followed, they should proceed to a busy location and contact the Police immediately. The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is assuring that adequate security will be provided in major commercial areas during the festive season to ensure public safety. Speaking with JIS News, Communications Officer, JCF’s Corporate Communications Unit, Sergeant Shaunjay Mitchell, says additional personnel have been deployed to reinforce security in the areas.last_img read more

NBC has best ratings week for a network in 2 months

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – NBC cut through the summer doldrums with the best week for a television network since the NBA Finals were seen on ABC two months ago.NBC was led, as is typical during the summer months, by “America’s Got Talent.” The competition show was seen by 11.8 million people last week, more than four million more than anything else on television, the Nielsen company said.Joining favourites like “American Ninja Warrior” and “World of Dance,” NBC added a new competition series in “Making It,” a crafting show co-hosted by former “Parks and Recreation” co-stars Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman. Its audience of 5.2 million people made it the most-watched new series of the summer, Nielsen said.Football, which will be a mainstay of broadcast network schedules through January, started its preseason with the Hall of Fame game, seen by 6.8 million people on NBC.NBC averaged 4.7 million viewers for the week, CBS had 3.8 million, ABC had 3.1 million, Fox had 1.9 million, ION Television had 1.4 million, Telemundo has 1.2 million, Univision had 1.1 million and the CW had 840,000.Fox News Channel was the week’s most popular cable network, averaging 2.34 million viewers in prime time. MSNBC had 1.58 million, USA had 1.38 million, HGTV had 1.36 million and Hallmark had 1.1 million.ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped the evening newscasts with an average of 7.8 million viewers. NBC’s “Nightly News” had 7.4 million and the “CBS Evening News” had 5.5 million.For the week of July 30-Aug. 5, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: “America’s Got Talent,” NBC, 11.83 million; “60 Minutes,” CBS, 7.54 million; NFL Exhibition Football: Chicago vs. Baltimore, NBC, 6.77 million; “NFL Preseason Kickoff,” NBC, 6.57 million; “Celebrity Family Feud,” ABC, 5.96 million; “The Big Bang Theory,” CBS, 5.86 million; “Big Brother” (Thursday), CBS, 5.62 million; “Big Brother” (Sunday), CBS, 5.57 million; “Big Brother” (Wednesday), CBS, 5.55 million; “Young Sheldon,” CBS, 5.5 million.___ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.___Online:http://www.nielsen.comlast_img read more

Mounties in Dawson Creek seize stolen pickup and guns from Mile Zero

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. – One man was arrested in Dawson Creek late last week after police recovered a pickup truck and a number of firearms that were found to have been stolen.Cst. Jaime Ekkel with the Dawson Creek RCMP said that on Friday, July 6th, officers were conducting a proactive patrol in the Mile Zero Trailer park when officers noted a pickup truck parked in front of a home which had an incorrect license plate attached.After officers ran a search on the truck’s vehicle identification number, the truck was confirmed to have been previously reported stolen. A man and two women were located inside of the home, and the man was subsequently arrested. The two women were requested to leave the property.A search warrant was executed at the home, where police located multiple stolen firearms, ammunition and knives.Prohibited items such as 15-round pistol magazines and a homemade ‘stun gun’ were also located inside the home.Weapons and stolen property were also found inside the pickup truck.Cst. Ekkel said that the man is still in police custody. His identity has not been released since no charges have yet been laid.last_img read more

Taxpayers can compare tax liability declared in final summary GST return forms

first_imgNew Delhi: The GST Network Tuesday said businesses registered under GST can now compare the tax liability declared as well as input tax credit claimed in their final and summary sales returns forms. The GSTN, which handles the technology backbone for the new indirect tax, has provided a facility to the taxpayers to view and download a report on tax liability as declared in their form GSTR- 1 (final sales return) and as declared and paid in their return filed in form GSTR-3B (summary sales return). Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in SepWhile GSTR-1 for a month is filed by the 11th day of the succeeding month, GSTR-3B is filed and taxes paid by the 20th day of the succeeding month. GSTN, in a statement said, since GSTR-1 and GSTR-3B are filed independent of each other, a need was felt to provide facility to view liability declared in both the forms at one place. The new facility enables the taxpayers to view these two liabilities in one table for each return period at one place, which can be compared. This will enable taxpayers to make good of any differences between the two forms filed by them on GST portal, GSTN said. Further, the GSTN has also provided taxpayers information regarding data of Input tax credit (ITC) as claimed in their form GSTR 3B and as accrued in form GSTR 2A, based on the return uploaded by the supplier. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to CustomsThis functionality has been provided in Returns dashboard on the GST Portal to taxpayers under the headings “Comparison of liability declared and ITC claimed”. “This facility will help taxpayers in reconciling their liability and ITC details quickly. They can view the monthly comparison as well as cumulative comparison upto the month, on the GST Portal in the tables provided. This will help them in taking corrective steps,” GSTN CEO Prakash Kumar said.last_img read more

Was told I wasnt good enough

first_imgNew Delhi: She made a stunning debut with Dangal, but Fatima Sana Shaikh says getting a perfect launch pad was not a cakewalk as people told her she did not have the “looks” of a heroine like Deepika Padukone and Katrina Kaif. Fatima, who started her journey in the movies as a child actor with Kamal Haasan’s 1997 film Chachi 420, says the rejections shifted her focus from waiting for a conventional lead role to searching for a good character. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka”I have been a child actor. I quit but making a comeback after that was difficult. I was not getting any work. People used to tell me I don’t look like Deepika Padukone or Katrina Kaif. They said, since I didn’t have the looks of a heroine, I should do whatever I’m offered. There have been many incidents where I was told that I was not good enough,” Fatima said. The actor says her desire to perform in front of the camera was so strong that she did not pay heed to what people thought of her. Also Read – Salman Khan remembers actor Vinod Khanna”I only had acting on my mind. The reason why I used to go for every audition was because I would get to perform in front of the camera, even if the set-up was small.” The success of Aamir Khan-starrer Dangal, however, made things easier for Fatima as it gave her the option to choose. “Before Dangal, I never had the chance to choose my projects. I even did ‘Dangal’ because that was my only option at that time. Every actor goes through this. That’s how things function. But I am happy that post the film and especially after ‘Thugs of Hindostan’, I have the space to choose,” she says. Citing an example of Rajkummar Rao, her co-star from Anurag Basu’s upcoming anthology, the actor says there is no formula for success. “There is no single rule that applies to everyone. But now there are so many opportunities because of Netflix, Amazon and other platforms. Influx of different mediums has given actors a lot more options.” Fatima says even though her aim is to establish herself as a sought-after performer, she does not believe in planning “too much”. “Where I want to reach it might take two or maybe six years. But I am happy that at least I’m on my way.”last_img read more