Adam Jones to miss the whole of the Six Nations

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “If we lose Adam Jones we lose our cornerstone,” said legendary Wales prop Graham Price to the BBC“And we haven’t got anybody to replace him. There is nobody waiting in the wings for an opportunity to do a job, certainly nobody who puts their hand up. He’s certainly crucial to our forward effort, and looking forward to the Six Nations, if Adam is not fit that is one area we are going to struggle. An area [the scrum] where we thought we were going to do ok, and we could build our game on, all of a sudden it’s starting to fall apart.” Adam Jones (centre) will miss the Six Nations TournamentThe Ospreys medical team have received confirmation of the extent of lay-off facing Adam Jones after he suffered an elbow injury during Sunday’s Heineken Cup game against London Irish. Having received the medical reports following the player undergoing a scan earlier this week, Ospreys Head Physio, Chris Towers, has confirmed that Jones could be out for up to eight weeks, meaning he won’t be back for the final match of the Championship, against France on 19 March.Towers said: “The scans have confirmed our suspicion of significant ligament damage and soft tissue trauma to the left elbow. We’ve discussed the case at length, both with orthopaedic specialists and the WRU medical team, and expect that Adam is likely to be out for around eight weeks.”Jones joins 70-times capped Tom Shanklin, Gethin Jenkins and banned scrum-half Richie Rees on the sidelines for the tournament.last_img read more

The world mourns Nelson Mandela

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The iconic moment Nelson Mandela handed the Webb Ellis cup to Francois Pienaar, delighting all of South AfricaSOUTH AFRICA is mourning and the world is feeling the loss of Madiba, Nelson Mandela.A lot of things will be said about the great man over the next few weeks, but one thing is unavoidable – particularly with regards to the iconic image above – he truly harnessed the positive power of rugby.We delved back into our archives to see what was written about Mandela in Rugby World in 1995, following South Africa’s World Cup. The August edition had just one cover line: “South Africa’s greatest triumph.”Inside, with editor Peter Bills’ letter, he wrote: “Writing this, in a Cape Town room overlooking the bay and Robben Island, offers one a proper perspective on Rugby World Cup 1995. “Nelson Mandela put behind him all the emotional baggage of the white racists’ game to endorse rugby with open arms. For a man who suffered what he endured, notably on Robben Island, to have personally embraced the white South African players and have donned a Springbok cap at an ANC youth rally, asking everyone to support the team ‘because they are our kind’, confirmed the man’s credentials for sainthood.”And to that abiding memory of Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis trophy, Rugby World’s David Lawrenson was there, taking it all in.center_img “The delightful image of Nelson Mandela dancing with happiness as South Africa fulfilled its long, long dream of World Cup triumph will in the memory forever,” Lawrenson wrote. “It was one of hundreds of deeply emotional scenes, as the South African nation united in celebration. Tears of passion and delight were everywhere.”Mandela achieved so much and battled through unimaginable troubles, but for rugby fans, this moment will be what does live forever in the memory.last_img read more

Nine changes for Wales as Gareth Davies retains No 9 shirt

first_img Gareth Davies in action against Uruguay Behind them it’s all change in the second row, with Alun Wyn Jones and Bradley Davies partnered as Luke Charteris drops to the bench. Taulupe Faletau and Dan Lydiate come into the team for James King and Justin Tipuric respectively.Dan Biggar gets the nod ahead of Rhys Priestland, while Jamie Roberts returns to the team in place of Cory Allen, who injured a hamstring after scoring a hat-trick against Uruguay. George North also comes in, replacing Alex Cuthbert on the wing. Warren Gatland brings in nine players for the game against England on Saturday, but retains four-cap Gareth Davies at scrum-half Wales coach Warren Gatland has stuck with scrum-half Gareth Davies for the crunch game against England on Saturday evening, with the experienced Mike Phillips failing to make the bench.Lloyd Williams will be the replacement No 9 and is preferred by Gatland ahead of the 94-cap Phillips, who was called into the squad before the World Cup after Rhys Webb’s injury.While Davies keeps his place from the win over Uruguay on opening weekend, Gatland has made nine changes across the pitch including two in the front row.The vastly experienced Gethin Jenkins comes in for Paul James, while Samson Lee starts on the bench as Tomas Francis replaces the Scarlets man, who was an injury doubt this week.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales: Liam Williams; North, S Williams, Roberts, Amos;  Biggar, G Davies; Jenkins, Baldwin, Francis, B Davies, AW Jones, Lydiate, Warburton (capt), Faletau. Replacements: Owens, Jarvis, Lee, Charteris, Tipuric, Lloyd Williams, Priestland, Cuthbert.last_img read more

Inside the mind of Michael Cheika

first_img FOR SOMEONE who never saw himself as a coach (Wallaby icon David Campese first suggested him for a job) and doesn’t need to coach (he’s a self-made millionaire), Michael Cheika has proved a damn successful one.He’s the only coach to win a premier club competition in both hemispheres, guiding Leinster to their first Heineken Cup title in 2009 and the Waratahs to Super Rugby glory in 2014, while last month Australia won the Rugby Championship less than a year after he took charge of the team, beating New Zealand for the first time in 11 attempts in the process.Cheika is not one to sing his own praises. He won’t even pick out a coaching highlight, preferring to focus on the next challenge and insisting retirement is when you look back on what you’ve achieved. However, a look at his background and coaching style provides an insight into why he’s been so successful…Big winners: the Wallabies celebrate winning the Rugby ChampionshipON TRENDA rampaging No 8 for Randwick, Cheika also turned out for clubs in Italy and France during the late Eighties and early Nineties, “playing all year round”. There came a point, however, when he wanted to spend more time at home in Australia and needed to get a job.He hadn’t gone on to higher education after leaving school but had family who worked in the fashion industry and found out that Australian designer Collette Dinnigan was looking for someone who could speak French and Italian. He may not have been a keen follower of clothing trends but his language skills – as the son of Lebanese immigrants he can speak Arabic as well as English, French and Italian – meant he was the perfect fit. “I ran the business side of things – logistics, finance, all the normal stuff you have in any business,” he explains. “They’re not all creatives!”Stepping out: David Campese got Cheika to move abroadAfter that initial break, Cheika went on to work for another designer before setting up his own clothing company, Live Fashion, which has proved very profitable. In the meantime, former team-mate Campese got in touch to ask whether he fancied a coaching gig in Padova, his fluency in Italian again a key factor.“I was working for Collette at the time and was still playing here in Sydney,” he recalls. “Campo asked if I’d be interested in coaching in Italy as he knew I spoke the language. I’d never thought about coaching but I said, ‘Why not? I enjoy rugby and could test myself in a different environment. If I like it, I’ll keep doing it.’ And I had a great time in Padova. It worked for me.”NORTH v SOUTHPadova was the start of his coaching journey but there have been several stops since in both hemispheres. And it’s not just his rugby experience that has helped him as a coach – he’s also drawn on his business background. “People management and personal skills are key. Whether in business or sport, you’re just looking to get the best out of people. I have experience of doing that with my own business and rugby. You learn how to handle people to get the best out of them.”It’s the man-management that Test centurion George Smith sees as Cheika’s greatest strength. Wasps’ new flanker worked with Cheika at Stade Français and has also been in touch with the coach to discuss his World Cup availability. Smith says: “I find Cheiks to be a very good man-manager. He has the utmost respect for players and understands them on and off the field.He has a good feeling for that aspect of management.“I enjoyed his coaching style. He’s the type of person who will give you constructive advice. In my experience, he’s very measured and thinks carefully about what he’s going to say. He doesn’t shoot from the hip.”Pretty in pink: Cheika while coaching Stade FrancaisThat has not always been the case. Cheika was very vocal about his displeasure at refereeing decisions when a late Harlequins try cost Stade the European Challenge Cup title in 2011 – he was fined for verbally abusing officials – and Shane Jennings has spoken of how he would go “f***ing bananas” if Leinster underperformed. Yet he has always been able to inspire his teams.As Brian O’Driscoll told Rugby World a few years ago: “What amazed me was, after five years as coach, his team talks never became repetitive. He was always able to captivate his audience and that’s not easy with a long tenure. He’s a very good coach and a very good speaker.” Whatever happens during this World Cup, Cheika is sure to do things his way. After all, it’s proved mightily effective so far.This feature first appeared in the October 2015 issue of Rugby World magazine. You can purchase Jerome Kaino’s autobiography here. The praise may be plentiful, particularly from those at Leinster who saw him transform the province from perennial underachievers to European champions, but there was still an element of self–doubt when he returned Down Under in 2013. Could the tactics employed in Europe prove as effective in Super Rugby?“I was petrified when I came back to coach the Waratahs because I’d never coached at that level in the southern hemisphere,” he admits. “I’d seen games on TV and they looked pretty different, and I wasn’t sure if what I had in my kitbag would work. I learnt pretty quickly and (assistant coach) Daryl Gibson showed me what was required in Super Rugby. Nathan Grey helped me as well because he was experienced in Super Rugby. Test level is a different challenge again now.”THE ULTIMATE TESTCheika was named Australia coach last October following Ewen McKenzie’s resignation and was thrust straight into an end-of-year tour. After guiding the Waratahs to the Super Rugby play-offs again this year, he has taken the Australia reins full-time and has quickly put his unique imprint on things.Take the decision for the coaching team to line up alongside their players for the anthem ahead of the Rugby Championship decider against the All Blacks – an extremely unfamiliar sight. It’s a quirk they repeated the following week, when they lost 41-13 to the world champions. We’ll have to wait to see whether they continue the display of solidarity during the World Cup but Cheika says: “It was a last-minute decision. I wanted my team to feel like we were with them, that we weren’t judging them. It worked out to be a great experience.”Another example of Cheika doing things differently is his World Cup squad selection, going against the norm by selecting only two specialist hookers and scrum-halves. It’s been called a calculated risk and the hooker call, in particular, has raised a few eyebrows. Still, there have been notable improvements in the scrum for Australia, although Cheika is quick to play down such talk ahead of their tussles in Pool A.Words of wisdom: Cheika talks with David Pocock, pitchside“I don’t think England and Wales will be worried about our scrum. It’s up to us to improve in that area and be up for the battle. I still think teams over there will see it as a big weakness of ours and will target us.”One area where Cheika has been consistent throughout his career is his desire to play an entertaining, ball-in-hand game. The Wallabies have a plethora of playmakers and with players like Israel Folau, Quade Cooper and Matt Giteau in the squad, it’s a strategy that makes sense. The difficulty has been trying to unpick the more organised defences on the international stage.“I’ve always played a running style of game, a very attacking style of game, but obviously it becomes more and more difficult at Test level. There are much better defenders and less holes to get into, so you can run up dark alleys. The challenge is to get variation in the way we play and get the guys enjoying that style.“We’ve had a good period of time training together and have been improving – and we should be improving, otherwise I wouldn’t be doing my job. I’m happy that as a group we’re enjoying ourselves and are getting better together.” Team talk: Michael Cheika addresses his troops earlier in the season center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fluent in four languages, a friend of fashion designers and a successful businessman – there’s more to Australia coach Michael Cheika than meets the eye… This feature first appeared in the October 2015 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

30 Minutes with… Crusaders coach Scott Robertson

first_imgFormer All Blacks back-row Scott Robertson talks pranks, players and party guests Merry dance: Scott Robertson enjoys Canterbury’s Mitre 10 Cup triumph in 2016. Photo: Getty Images Not knowing. To do my job as head coach and solve any issues people have, I need to know about them, otherwise I can’t help.What about phobias? Missing out. I love a party and if I know a party is going on and I’m not there I’m pretty gutted. So I don’t miss too many parties – the easiest way not to get FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out).If you could have one superpower, what would it be?To teleport. Then I could go to all the best surf spots in the world and enjoy the beach lifestyle.Who would be your three dream dinner party guests? Laird Hamilton – he’s a big wave surfer, a pioneer in the surf industry. Who else? The Naked Chef, Jamie Oliver – he could cook. And Jennifer Lawrence – she’s a good sort.Party guest: Actress Jennifer Lawrence would provide interesting dinner conversation. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s the worst job you’ve ever had? I played rugby in Newtownards in County Down and I worked as a hodman, carrying cement in a wheelbarrow. I was the worst worker they’d ever had. I had a great time in Ireland, though. It was the first time in my life I’d been overweight – all that Guinness.Do you have any hidden talents? I’m a good swimmer. I was New Zealand’s junior surf life-saving champion and enjoy water sports.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img To create a good family environment for my three boys and to give them every opportunity to be successful. They’re 13, 11 and nine – it’s a lively household!This article originally appeared in the August 2017 issue of Rugby World. Tell us about your breakdancing after winning competitions… It comes from my playing days. I think the first time was up in Wellington; the boys called me out, chanting ‘Hey Ho Razor Ray’. It’s something I’d done behind closed doors and those doors quickly opened with peer pressure. Now it’s become a bit of a tradition, although I’d say I’m better at 4am than after a game.What’s the funniest thing you’ve heard on the pitch? I was having a tussle on the ground with Taine Randell in a Canterbury v Otago game. Anton Oliver told me to leave it out and Norm Maxwell stepped in to say: “Anton, you just worry about your lineout throwing because the rest of the country is.”That was after a Test series when he had overthrown a lot. It was brutal to say it, in the middle of the 2001 NPC final. We won the match!Who are the jokers in the Crusaders squad? Israel Dagg is one – he’s a great character and brings a lot of energy to the group. Jordan Taufua does all our chants and songs. He helps the vibe with music. He’s also in the team band.Joking around: Crusaders team-mates Kieran Read and Israel Dagg. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat about pranks? Guys go round to each other’s houses and film themselves pretending to mow the lawn or having dinner. Every week a video will play in front of the whole team and everyone is hoping it’s not their driveway and their wife greeting guys at the door. Players’ partners are all in on it.If you could be one of your players, who would it be? That’s one of the best questions I’ve ever had. It’s tough… Kieran Read – he’s played more Tests than I did, has captained the All Blacks whereas I was vice-captain and has played more Crusaders games. He’s a hell of a bloke and a hell of a leader.How did you get your ‘Razor’ nickname? In my first year at the Crusaders, 1996, we were playing the Brumbies and I cut Pat Howard in half. I said: “You see that boys? It was like he ran into a blade, a razor blade. That’s my right shoulder!” So it was a bit of self-promotion.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREDo you have any bugbears? last_img read more

2018 Rugby Championship Preview

first_imgWho’s going to come out on top in this year’s Rugby Championship? We take a look at the contenders 8 Sep8.35amAll Blacks vs ArgentinaTrafalgar Park, Nelson Contest: Australia and Ireland played a narrow series in June (Getty Images)South AfricaCoach – Rassie Erasmus2018 Form – Played 4, won 2 (both against England), lost 2 (once to Wales, once to England)Strengths – Super Rugby finalists the Lions are strong and their players will form a big part of the squad. They are always physically demanding to play against and have confidence following their series win against England.Weaknesses – Rassie Erasmus is still settling in as coach and they haven’t beaten New Zealand or Australia since Round 5 of the 2016 tournament. Some big players like Eben Etzebeth and Warren Whiteley are returning from injuries so may take time to get up to speed.One To Watch – Faf de KlerkA constant threat on the edges of the scrum or breakdown, de Klerk was a huge factor in South Africa’s series win over England in June. His game management is solid because he is more than capable of speeding up or slowing down the pace of play. His box-kicks are usually pinpoint too. However, he’s unlikely to play in all South Africa’s games as Erasmus looks for a compromise with his club, Sale Sharks.Shark: Sale scrum-half Faf De Klerk was sublime for South Africa against England (Getty Images)Victor Matfield on South Africa: “We’re better off than a year back, there’s a lot of improvement in that England series but there is still a lot of work to be done.”Fourie Du Preez on South Africa: “The previous two years it’s been really bad, the first XV has been in quite a transition, but I am personally quite positive about South Africa’s chances.”Full Squad Forwards: Cyle Brink, Jean-Luc du Preez, Thomas du Toit, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Eben Etzebeth, Steven Kitshoff, Siya Kolisi (captain), Francois Louw, Wilco Louw, Frans Malherbe, Malcolm Marx, Bongi Mbonambi, Franco Mostert, Tendai Mtawarira, Sikhumbuzo Notshe, Marvin Orie, RG Snyman, Akker van der Merwe, Marco van Staden, Warren Whiteley.Backs: Lukhanyo Am, Ross Cronjé, Faf de Klerk, Aphiwe Dyantyi, André Esterhuizen, Elton Jantjies, Jesse Kriel, Willie le Roux, Makazole Mapimpi, Lionel Mapoe, Lwazi Mvovo, Embrose Papier, Handré Pollard, Ivan van Zyl, Damian Willemse.On The Up: South Africa celebrate their series win over England (Getty Images)ArgentinaCoach – Mario Ledesma2018 Form – Played 3, lost 3 (twice to Wales, once to Scotland)Strengths – Jaguares, their Super Rugby side, showed improvement this year and if they can take some of that attacking threat into this tournament they will cause opponents problems. Plus, they are starting to select overseas-based players again, which gives them more experience and depth.Weaknesses – Head coach Daniel Hourcade resigned following the June Tests and has been replaced by Jaguares head coach Mario Ledesma. He knows the players well but does he have enough time to implement significant changes? The Pumas were poor in June, lacking creativity in attack and missing their usual strength up front, so big improvements are needed if they are to be competitive.Related: Mario Ledesma new Argentina coachOne To Watch – Emiliano Boffelli A prodigy from a young age, Boffelli was thrust into the national set-up early on. He has represented his country at U20, sevens and Test level, and has great vision and huge kicking capabilities.Utility: Boffelli can play across the back three (Getty Images)Mario Ledesma on Argentina: “We need to get back to the fundamentals of our game. Good defending wins games.”Full Squad Forwards: Marco Ciccioli, Lucas Favre, Santiago García Botta, Santiago Medrano, Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro, Mayco Vivas, Juan Pablo Zeiss, Agustín Creevy (captain), Diego Fortuny, Julián Montoya, Matías Alemanno, Ignacio Larrague, Tomás Lavanini, Franco Molina, Guido Petti, Rodrigo Bruni, Santiago Grondana, Marcos Kremer, Juan Manuel Leguizamón, Pablo Matera, Javier Ortega Desio.Back: Gonzalo Bertranou, Tomás Cubelli, Martín Landajo, Joaquín Díaz Bonilla, Nicolás Sánchez, Jerónimo de la Fuente, Bautista Ezcurra, Santiago González Iglesias, Matías Moroni, Matías Orlando, Sebastián Cancelliere, Bautista Delguy, Ramiro Moyano, Emiliano Boffelli, Juan Cruz Mallía.Promotion: Jaguares coach Mario Ledesma has been promoted to the Argentina job (Getty Images)2018 Rugby Championship Fixture List Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. 18 Aug4.05pmSouth Africa vs ArgentinaKings Park, Durban LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 18 Aug10.45amWallabies vs All BlacksANZ Stadium, Sydney 29 Sep11.40pmArgentina vs All BlacksEstadio Velez Sarsfield, Buenos Aires (All times are UK & Ireland) 2018 Rugby Championship PreviewWith the culmination of the Super Rugby season, the number one rugby union competition in the southern hemisphere is about to begin – the Rugby Championship.We run the rule over each team – their strengths and weaknesses, and how they look going into the competition. Legends of the game also weigh in on their respective teams.New ZealandCoach – Steve Hansen2018 Form – Played 3, won 3 (all against France)Strengths – Number one ranked team in the world, world-class players across the pitch, and their strength in depth is astounding. Most of the squad know what it takes to win at international level and experience is always important. Finally, despite the scorelines, they were well tested by France in the summer.Weaknesses – Because they are the best team in the world, occasionally the All Blacks are prone to complacency. Some of their big players are coming back from injuries – Brodie Retallick, Dane Coles and Sonny Bill Williams for example. Additionally, will the players coming in from the Crusaders be tired? They have had a long season getting to the Super Rugby final once again and could be fatigued going into the Rugby Championship.One To Watch – Rieko IoaneCould be several players in this spot, but it’s hard to look passed Rieko Ioane. He always looks to attack, whilst also being deceptively strong and devastatingly quick.Related: Rieko Ioane on why he’s like “a kid in a candy store”Youngster: Rieko Ioane is our one to watch for the All Blacks (Getty Images)Christian Cullen on the All Blacks: “New Zealand rugby is on a bit of a high right now. I think they’ve got all the cups at the moment with the sevens and the women. New Zealand rugby is always going to be strong, over the years when someone leaves, when a Dan Carter leaves or a Richie McCaw leaves, there is always someone that can step up and that’s always been a strength.“In Super Rugby, New Zealand has one of the hardest conferences. I think four of the teams made it into the play-offs and that just shows you how strong it is. Playing those derby games it’s tough for the players but it’s good to get the younger boys in the competition. Some of them are almost like Test matches – that’s how tough they are.”Full SquadForwards: Dane Coles, Codie Taylor, Nathan Harris, Owen Franks, Joe Moody, Tim Perry, Karl Tu’inukuafe, Ofa Tu’ungafasi, Scott Barrett, Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock, Sam Cane, Jackson Hemopo, Shannon Frizell, Kieran Read (captain), Ardie Savea, Liam Squire, Luke Whitelock.Backs: TJ Perenara, Aaron Smith, Te Toiroa Tahuriorangi, Beauden Barrett, Damian McKenzie, Richie Mo’unga, Ryan Crotty, Jack Goodhue, Sonny Bill Williams, Anton Lienert-Brown, Jordie Barrett, Rieko Ioane, Nehe Milner-Skudder, Waisake Naholo, Ben Smith.World Class: Beauden Barrett will likely lead the line for the All Blacks (Getty Images)AustraliaCoach – Michael Cheika2018 Form – Played 3, won 1, lost 2 (all against Ireland)Strengths – They will be battle hardened following the highly competitve Test series against Ireland, while David Pocock and Michael Hooper are a troublesome pair at the breakdown. Australia are always a significant test for any team.Weaknesses – Could be limited in creativity outside of Israel Folau and Kurtley Beale, and their young pack needs more experience.One To Watch – Taniela TupouA 20st man mountain, Tupou made his debut for the Wallabies against Scotland last year and has put in good performances to make sure he remains in the Australia set-up. Still only 22, the prop is one for the future.Tongan Thor: Tupou has a great nickname (Getty Images)George Gregan on Australia: “They just had a really tight series with Ireland in June, an awesome series, and both teams scored 55 points, so they played some really good rugby in there, but at times they just haven’t found that consistency in winning and that’s really really important.“I like what they’re doing with the tight forwards. It’s a good young pack and the set-piece was pretty good. The lineout needs a bit of improvement, but I was really happy with the way they attacked. They’ve got some really positive signs in that regard.”Full Squad Forwards: Jermaine Ainsley, Allan Alaalatoa, Rory Arnold, Adam Coleman, Folau Faingaa, Ned Hanigan, Michael Hooper (captain), Sekope Kepu, Tolu Latu, Brandon Paenga-Amosa, David Pocock, Tatafu Polota-Nau, Tom Robertson, Izack Rodda, Pete Samu, Rob Simmons, Scott Sio, Caleb Timu, Lukhan Tui, Taniela Tupou.Backs: Tom Banks, Kurtley Beale, Israel Folau, Bernard Foley, Will Genia, Dane Haylett-Petty, Reece Hodge, Marika Koroibete, Jack Maddocks, Billy Meakes, Sefa Naivalu, Jordan Petaia, Nick Phipps, Joe Powell, Curtis Rona, Matt Toomua. 25 Aug8.10pmArgentina vs South AfricaEstadio Malvinas Argentinas, Mendozacenter_img 15 Sep8.35amAll Blacks vs South AfricaWestpac Stadium, Wellington 8 Sep11amWallabies vs SpringboksSuncorp Stadium, Brisbane 6 Oct4.05pmSouth Africa vs All BlacksLoftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria Imperious: The All Blacks have won 5 of the last 6 competitions (Getty Images) 25 Aug8.35amAll Blacks vs WallabiesEden Park, Auckland 6 Oct11.40pmArgentina vs WallabiesEstadio Padre Ernesto Martearena, Salta 15 Sep11amWallabies vs ArgentinaCbus Super Stadium, Gold Coast DateTimeTeamsVenue 29 Sep4.05pmSouth Africa vs WallabiesNelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabethlast_img read more

La Rda. Gay Jennings es electa presidente de la Cámara…

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention 2012, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Gay Jennings[Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis] La Rda. Gary Clark Jennings, de la Diócesis de Ohio, y quien ha sido ocho veces diputada a la Convención General, fue electa presidente de la Cámara de Diputados esta mañana en la primera votación. Ella comenzará su período de tres años al término de la Convención General el 12 de julio.Será la tercera mujer electa a ese cargo y la primera que sucede a otra mujer. Bonnie Anderson, de la Diócesis de Michigan, que está concluyendo su segundo período de tres años en esta convención, decidió no ir a la reelección por un tercer período.Jennings se dirigió a sus colegas diputados inmediatamente después que se anunciara el resultado de la votación y les agradeció la confianza que habían puesto en ella con estas palabras: “Haré lo mejor que pueda para servirles, a esta magnifica cámara y a la Iglesia que todos amamos”.Ella le dio especiales gracias a la diputada Martha Alexander de Carolina del Norte y al Rdo. Frank Logue, diputado de Georgia, que también habían sido nominados, y dijo que esperaba trabajar con ellos. Jennings obtuvo 426 votos, cinco más del número que necesitaba para salir electa. Logue obtuvo 266 y Alexander 140. Alexander luego pidió que Jennings fuera electa por aclamación.El esposo de Jennings, el Rdo. Albert Jennings, se le unió en el podio al tiempo que ella le pedía [a los diputados] que le compartieran sus ideas. “Por favor, háganme saber cómo puedo servirles mejor”, dijo.En una declaración por escrito que se divulgó poco después, Jennings expuso que se presentó a la elección porque “creo que Dios me está llamando a trabajar con los líderes de toda la Iglesia para cambiar, en el próximo trienio, la manera que tenemos de funcionar. Para que la Iglesia Episcopal importe en el siglo XXI, tenemos que encontrar formas de avanzar juntos”.En una conferencia de prensa, le preguntaron cómo el debate sobre la reestructuración de la Iglesia influiría en su labor como presidente. Jennings, que fue copresidenta del Comité sobre Estructura de la Convención, dijo que las deliberaciones del grupo la habían ayudado a ver que “esto es algo que tenemos que hacer”. Agregó que “obispos, diputados, funcionarios y toda clase de personas andan diciendo “debemos cambiar”. No estoy segura de haber oído muchas sugerencias concretas, pero existe el deseo de ahondar un proceso de exploración y de discernimiento”.Ella dijo también que espera trabajar con la Obispa Primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, cuyo período [al frente de la Iglesia] termina dentro de tres años. “Haré todo lo que esté en mi poder para trabajar en colaboración y colegialidad” y agregó: “La Obispa Primada habla por toda la Iglesia. Yo hablo por la Cámara de Diputados”.La Cámara de Diputados es una de las dos cámaras de la Convención General, el organismo legislativo de la Iglesia Episcopal que se reúne cada tres años. Incluye hasta cuatro diputados laicos y cuatro clérigos de cada una de las 111 jurisdicciones de la Iglesia Episcopal representadas aquí. La Cámara de Obispos, compuesta de todos los obispos activos y jubilados, constituye la otra mitad. Cualquier legislación debe ser aprobada por ambas cámaras para entrar en vigor.Además de presidir [la Cámara de Diputados] durante la Convención General, Jennings también servirá ahora como vicepresidente del Consejo Ejecutivo y de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (la entidad corporativa de la Iglesia Episcopal). También nombrará a miembros clérigos y laicos de todas las comisiones permanentes y comités legislativos de la Convención.Jennings dejó en junio la plantilla de CREDO, un programa de bienestar social del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, luego de haber trabajado allí durante nueve años. Antes de eso había sido la canóniga del ordinario en la Diócesis de Ohio durante 17 años. Fue ordenada al diaconado en 1978 y al presbiterado en 1979, y prestó servicios en parroquias de Virginia y Ohio en los primeros años de su ministerio. Ella acaba de concluir un período de seis años en el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal. También es uno de los miembros clericales de la delegación de la Iglesia Episcopal al Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, el principal organismo que diseña políticas en la Comunión Anglicana, cuya próxima reunión será este otoño en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda.– Melodie Woerman es miembro del equipo de Episcopal News Service en la Convención General. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tagscenter_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL La Rda. Gay Jennings es electa presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY President of the House of Deputies General Convention, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Por Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 10, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Council considers status of Anglican Covenant in small groups

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 31, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Jean Mayland says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Comments (1) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Council considers status of Anglican Covenant in small groups ‘We’re still in communion,’ one member notes Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Zealand Diocese of Christchurch Victoria Matthews and Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams speak together Oct. 31 (local time) shortly after Matthews initiated the first formal discussion of the Anglican Covenant held during the Anglican Consultative Council’s 12-day meeting in Auckland. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] The Anglican Consultative Council spent an hour in private conversation on Oct. 31 (local time) considering the status of the Anglican Covenant but took no action.Those reflection group conversations, preceded by a short plenary session open to the public, has been the pattern of this 15th meeting of the ACC.Before the Oct. 31 reflection conversations began, New Zealand Diocese of Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews asked the members to consider “why [the covenant] is a cause of fear and why is it a sign of hope for others?”The results of the reflection conversations were to be given to the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order (IASCUFO) and the Anglican Communion Standing Committee “as they discern the ways to take the matter forward,” according to a handout on the process.The members are scheduled to again discuss the covenant on Nov. 6, the penultimate date of their Oct. 27-Nov. 7 meeting. It is not clear if any resolutions about the covenant will be proposed during that session.Episcopal Church ACC member Josephine Hicks told Episcopal News Service that her reflection group had a “very good conversation” with members from Tanzania, Kenya, Burundi, Australia, Scotland, West Indies, Mexico, Cuba and Pakistan, as well as herself.The groups heard from each member about the status of consideration of the covenant in their province, what that process has looked like and what the experience has taught the province about being Anglicans and being part of the Anglican Communion.Hicks said the conversation about the processes used in each province “reminded us that we govern ourselves through different processes around the communion and we struggle to understand each other’s process.”“Someone commented that hearing that a province has rejected or accepted the covenant impacts another province’s thinking process,” she said, adding that another person noted that “hearing early on that a number of African churches in particular thought [the covenant] wasn’t strong enough impacted provinces’ thinking.”When the group considered what the members have learned via the covenant process, Hicks said, “the real theme of those comments was that we have grown as a communion and we obviously have differences but, that what holds us together is much stronger than what divides us.”“We observed that we are still in communion even though some provinces have rejected the covenant and some have accepted it and some are still considering it,” Hicks said. “That demonstrates to us that we can still be in communion without a covenant.”Some members of the group said the “covenant process has helped us focus on something other than divisive issues,” according to Hicks.Hicks began her three-meeting term at the 2005 meeting in Nottingham, England when ACC members from both the U.S.-based Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada attended as observers after both provinces voluntarily withdrew their participation in keeping with a request from the Anglican Primates — or principal archbishops — to allow space for consideration of sexuality issues.She said some of the members of her reflection group here commented that “there’s a much less contentious feeling about this meeting [as compared with the intervening 2009 meeting in Jamaica] and people believe that part of that is covenant process helping us focus on relationships being more important than a piece of paper.”“That feeling seems palpable at this meeting,” she concluded.Matthews said during her presentation that “it is not IASCUFO’s work to promote the covenant but rather to monitor the reception of the covenant.”The bishop said that in the course of that monitoring as an ISACUFO member, she has learned that “there are actually two documents going around. One is the document that people have in their mind and the other document is the Anglican Covenant on paper.”“Sometimes the document under discussion is unrecognizable as the Anglican Covenant,” she said.During a table conversation the previous day, ACC members discussed how their provinces make hard decisions.“In the same way your province comes face-to-face with a hard decision, so does the Anglican Communion of churches,” Matthews told the council. “The question behind the covenant is what is the best way. Is there a way that will keep us together safely? What is our deepest fear when we consider decision-making processes?”Noting that the council had spent the previous evening considering how families can change their interactions from violent responses to ones of peace, Matthews suggested “that in the original idea of the covenant there was a desire to allow the Anglican Communion of churches to be a safe place for conversation and a sharing of ideas.“The actual document of the Anglican Covenant does not achieve that for all the churches of the Anglican Communion and that’s why some churches have said no to the document,” she said. “Nevertheless, as we heard last night, at the core of God’s covenant is ‘I will be your God and you will be my people.’ And we need to hold that before us.”Because there are “those who say [the covenant] is punitive and those who say it has no teeth,” Matthews said she believes that the covenant “is not yet perceived, yet alone received, as a truly safe way in which to encounter one another.”She invited the members to consider why for some the covenant is “something to be feared and for others a sign of hope.”And Matthews asked the council to “reflect on what there is in the covenant that offers a possible way for us to talk together” and whether the covenant might “potentially helpful in your province when you are faced with a difficult decision.”The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The last ACC meeting, in Jamaica in May 2009, decided to delay release of the third and final draft of the covenant to the provinces for their consideration because the ACC members thought the covenant’s process for resolving disputes needed more work.After a small working group solicited input from the provinces about that process, the final version of the covenant was released to the provinces for formal consideration in December 2009. An updated account of the status of that consideration is here.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.A complete list of the ACC15 participants is here.All ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Consultative Council, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group November 18, 2012 at 11:04 am Bishop Matthews just will not accept that many of us have read the Covenant,debated it and rejected it.WE DO NOT WANT IT! Anglican Covenant Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

The Holy Innocents: Newtown, Washington and the Way Forward

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Dec 19, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT ken johnson says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN The Holy Innocents: Newtown, Washington and the Way Forward Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Joyce Ann Edmondson says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 December 20, 2012 at 10:40 pm I believe this is an excellent “inclusive” article and comments made by the Archbishop very appropriate at this time as she seeks our cooperation in making changes in our lives to try to prevent these tragedies. I will certainly try to reach out to those I can and try to see Christ in them, as Mother Teresa said, in their distressing disguise. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC December 20, 2012 at 11:54 pm It is good to hear that as the church we are responding to this tragedy. The thing is that the shooting in Newtown is a rarity, perhaps that is why we are paying attention to it. Reality is that children are in more danger in their homes and with people they know than they are from strangers. Sadly this is also true in the church. They are not always safe places for our children. I spent my career working with these children of Jepthath that are sacrificed by their parents, families and also by the church. As the church leadership considers how to respond, I would urge them to consider how the church will respond the the issues of child abuse and domestic violence in our own communities and in our church. It is easier to focus way from our own behavior as a community and as the church to protect the children in our own back yard.The most effective way we can change the culture is to concentrate on our own behaviors and actions locally. We can spend our time pointing at others and saying “ain’t it awful,” writing letters to Congress and demanding political action. That is the easy part. Are we willing to step in and protect and care for the children in our own communities, families and parishes that are being hurt or have mental health issues? Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Comments (7) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA December 22, 2012 at 10:50 am I believe the following petition should be promoted in every parish:PETITIONTO: BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT SENATORS OF THE UNITED STATES SENATE MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVESWe the people of [name of church] are heartbroken over the senseless massacre of 20 children and six of their teachers in Newtown, Connecticut. We remember those killed: Charlotte Bacon, Daniel Barden, Rachel Davino, Olivia Engel, Josephine Gay, Ana M. Marquez-Greene, Dylan Hockley, Dawn Hocksprung, Madeleine F. Hsu, Catherine V. Hubbard, Chase Kowalski, JesseLewis, James Mattioli, Grace McDonnell, Anne Marie Murphy, Emilie Parker, Jack Pinto, Noah Pozner, Caroline Previdi, Jessica Rekos, Avielle Richman, Lauren Russeau, Mary Sherlach, Victoria Soto, Benjamin Wheeler, Allison N. Wyatt. Eternal rest grant to them O Lord.Since the horrific violence at Columbine there have been more than 100 incidents of gun violence in our schools and yet our elected officials have failed to act to restrict ownership of military style weapons capable of firing numerous rounds without reloading. Armed guards and armed teachers will not prevent violence but will increase the risk of injury.We implore our elected representatives promptly to enact legislation; 1. Banning the sale and ownership of assault weapons by individuals; 2. Banning the sale and possession of large ammunition magazines by individuals; 3. Requiring background checks for all sales of guns, including sales at gun shows and between private individuals. Press Release Service December 20, 2012 at 5:09 pm Many of us will be using the Collect printed above … but we shall amend its wording to say “… where the streets of our villages, towns and cities are filled with children plahing …”.Newtown, Connecticut, is not a city and most of the Episcopal Churches in the USA are not located in cities.Michael HartneyWatkins Glen, New York [population @2500] Mary H. Miller says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET January 15, 2013 at 3:13 pm Re. Mr Kramer’s Petition, I would add the following bans:4. Ban the manufacture, distribution and delivery of all and any assault and assault-style weapons and high-capacity clips except as required by law enforcement and national defence institutions.5. Ban the sale of any and all assault and assault-style weapons, lethality-increasing accessories made for the same, ammunition made for the same, and high-capacity clips over the internet.6. Place high excise taxs on all sales of weapons and ammunition both thru licensed retailers and gun shows.7. Quintuple the funding for the ATF. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Michael Hartney says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Keneth M. Kramer says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Gun Violence Rector Knoxville, TN December 20, 2012 at 8:41 pm 28 people died last Friday in Newtown CT, all of them created in the image of God. No matter what happens to that image over the course of a lifetime, we need to acknowledge and honor it. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Michael Seewer says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET December 21, 2012 at 5:46 am I will plan on sharing this information on our church website. It would be useful if there were a simple graphic that we could all have in common to visually identify this campaign to end violence. Might that be something that you can share with us, so we can all link to this useful information for our parish and website visitors? Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations has issued the following call to action.The Holy Innocents: Newtown, Washington, and the Way ForwardOne of the more striking contrasts on the Christian calendar is the commemoration of the Feast of the Holy Innocents on December 28, three days after the celebration of Christmas. In remembering the young children slaughtered by King Herod in Matthew’s account of Jesus’s birth, the Church jolts us from Christmas joy into a contemplation of the ways in which violence and human brokenness, in spite of Christmas, still enslave the human race.  Today, just as two thousand years ago, the most jolting violence of all is that committed against innocent children.This year, that jolt came earlier, and much more tangibly, than it normally does.  The murder of 26 innocent victims, many of them children, in a schoolhouse in Connecticut in the waning days of Advent ripped through the joy of Christmas for millions.  As our hearts and minds struggle to comprehend the tragedy of young lives cut short, Holy Innocents Day this year offers an opportunity for grace, hope, and inspiration for the days ahead.   It offers an opportunity “to awaken us” as Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in her message immediate after the shootings, “to the unnoticed number of children and young people who die senselessly across this land every day” and challenge us “to work toward a different future.”What might the creation of a different future look like?   Here are two suggestions:First, we must realize that the brokenness that created the violence at Sandy Hook Elementary School is much more deeply inscribed in our culture than we often realize. There is no simple solution; no single law that, if passed, will ensure that such a tragedy never happens again. Our culture simultaneously glorifies, and trivializes, violence while stigmatizing mental illness and discouraging diagnosis and treatment.  Our culture too-often allows millions of children to grow up in situations of risk and allows firearms to be available widely. Changing the cycle of violence will involve substantial creativity and commitment in our communities, the deployment of all the assets of our congregations, and a commitment to examining our own behaviors. Can you commit to being a part of this? Can your congregation commit?Second, we must hold our nation’s leaders accountable for creating public policies that address this cycle of violence. The Episcopal Church has, for many years, called for policies to keep guns out of the hands of criminals (and to make certain assault weapons impossible to own), as well as to promote better availability of mental-health care and other measures designed to address the causes and effects of violence in our communities. Most have not become law because of a culture in Washington that has allowed these policies to become politicized or driven by partisan rhetoric.  In these difficult days after the Sandy Hook shooting, there are some encouraging signs that this gridlock in Washington is abating.  We’ve seen this before in the wake of tragedy, however. Ultimate change will require building an immense advocacy network, creating a comprehensive strategy to address the problem from many angles, and bringing together people of many different viewpoints. The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations is working to create such a comprehensive advocacy strategy, as well as a nationwide network of advocates. Can you commit to being part of this effort? Can your congregation commit?If you answered yes to these questions, please do two things:1.     Commemorate victims of violence in our communities on Holy Innocents Day, or the Sunday following, and ask members of the congregation to be part of the solution.  Or pick another day soon when your congregation is gathered.  If the Connecticut massacre has taught us anything, it’s that any day might be Holy Innocents’ Day.  Conclude the Prayers of the People with the following, or a similar, collect:     Lord Jesus Christ, you stretched out your arms of love on the  hard wood of the cross to bring all of the world’s sufferings within your tender embrace:  Mercifully hear our prayers for all innocent victims of violence in our communities and throughout the world you so love.  Comfort those who mourn the loss of life, and receive the innocent into the arms of your mercy.   Accept our repentance for the ways in which we have encouraged and celebrated violence in our midst, and accomplish within us a true and lasting commitment to building the world you desire, where the streets of our cities are filled with children playing in safety; for with the Father and the Holy Spirit you live and reign, one God, for ever and ever.   Amen.2.    Visit here or http://episcopal.grassroots.com and sign up to be part of the solution. Share your stories of your commitment.  Hear the voices of others. Commit to being part of an ever-widening advocacy network that will play a key role in pursuit of a comprehensive strategy to break the cycles of violence in our culture.   Whether you’re a layperson, a deacon, a priest, or a bishop, there’s a role for you.  In 2013, as our nation’s leaders begin discussing solutions, you will hear from the Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations and other leaders on how to leverage your commitment for the greatest good. You will be asked to write to Congress and the President. You will be asked to encourage your friends to participate. You’ll be asked to help make a difference.  Right now, we ask you to sign the following pledge:     As an Episcopalian committed in baptism to seeking justice and peace and promoting the dignity of every human being, I commit to being part of the solution to the violence in our culture that claimed the lives of 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School and that claims the lives of 2000 innocent children through gun crimes each year. I commit to the pursuit of laws that keep guns out of the hands of criminals, prioritize the needs of at-risk children, provide care for mental illness, and address the many ways in which our culture both celebrates and trivializes violence. I commit to holding my lawmakers, my community, and my own household accountable.  I commit to accomplishing these things in 2013. I commit to being the change we need.Together, we can insist that our culture of violence change.   Together we can succeed.  As the prophet Jeremiah writes in the lesson appointed for Holy Innocents’ Day: “There is a reward for your work, says the Lord…there is hope for your future, says the Lord.  Your children shall come back into their own country.” Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Elaine Jenkins says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Former Bethlehem dean shepherded Delaware cathedral in final days

first_imgFormer Bethlehem dean shepherded Delaware cathedral in final days Featured Events By Sharon SheridanPosted May 24, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service The Very. Rev. William “Bill” Lane shepherded the Diocese of Delaware’s Cathedral Church of St. John through its closing in 2012. Previously, he served as dean of the Diocese of Bethlehem’s Cathedral Church of the Nativity in Pennsylvania. Photo:Danny N. Schweers/www.photoprayer.com[Episcopal News Service] As the Very Rev. William Lane describes it, the typical Episcopal cathedral is a parish-plus: plus hospitality to the diocese, plus prophetic ministry to the community, plus a showcase for best practices in worship and programs.“Cathedrals are a strange bird in the Episcopal Church,” said Lane, who served as dean of the Diocese of Bethlehem’s Cathedral Church of the Nativity in Pennsylvania and later as interim dean of the Diocese of Delaware’s Cathedral Church of St. John in Wilmington, shepherding its closing in July 2012.Most Episcopal cathedrals, he said, are like those he served: “a combination of parish church with an add-on, and it varies how big that add-on is, I guess, from diocese to diocese … Quite often it’s a focal point for diocesan functions and major functions in the life of the diocese.”But for those who serve as cathedral rector and dean, as for any other parish priest, “a good chunk of our ministry” focuses on meeting pastoral needs, running the parish and overseeing parish life, education, worship and liturgy, he said. “That pretty much was true in Bethlehem and true here in Delaware.”Ordained a priest in the Diocese of Maryland in 1964, Lane served both parish and diocesan ministries in Delaware from 1975 until his call to Bethlehem in 1997. He retired in January 2006 and returned to Delaware, becoming cathedral interim dean in June of that year. “I was there as one of the longest interims in the history of the church, I think!”Nativity was “an active growing parish and not looking over its shoulder at the possibilities of closing,” he recalled. Beyond running a full contingent of parish programs, it hosted most diocesan convocations and renewals of clergy vows and many ordinations.“Many of those things, of course, involved both diocesan personnel as well as the cathedral personnel,” Lane said. “It was at times demanding, but it was the kind of thing you enjoy doing, and we had good lay leadership at the cathedral to pitch in. … I never felt it as a burden.”To an extent, St. John mirrored that, he said. “We had good leadership here at St. John. We had a great music program. … Again, it was a joy to be kind of the host for many of the diocesan activities, and the diocese provided a lot of assistance … a lot of the people power.”The trouble was, there were fewer people. Lane arrived as interim knowing the cathedral might close in two years. Average Sunday attendance was 70 to 90, including the choir, compared to 180 in Bethlehem.“It was in an at-risk community,” he said. “Over the years, the congregation had dwindled partly because of demographics and location, and then the congregation was aging, and then the financial stuff began to hit. Things just began to multiply with dwindling numbers, dwindling pledges.”An endowment helped, but the income from it wasn’t enough when the markets dipped, he said.Dean William Lane leads a Bible study during a 2010 summer camp at the Cathedral Church of St. John, Wilmington, Delaware. Photo/Danny N. Schweers/www.photoprayer.comDuring his six-year tenure, they explored different options for keeping the cathedral open. They spent nearly a year talking with a charter school interested in locating there, “and then at the last minute … the charter school pulled out and found a different location.”The cathedral’s biggest “outreach and mission ministry” was the choir school, which served at-risk children and included services such as homework help and mentoring as well as musical training. It served, “any given season, anywhere from 25 to 40 children, most of them from the at-risk communities of the city,” Lane said. “We had talked about the possibilities of building out the choir school into a day school.”But that, too, didn’t pan out.“We gave it a shot and really worked hard, but in the end, we just couldn’t make it,” Lane said. “Finally, it just became clear that it wasn’t for lack of ministry and a lack of good worship and a lack of all the things you want, it was just a lack of funds, and there wasn’t enough people power there to generate the funds.” And, he said, “The diocese didn’t feel it had the major dollars to put into keeping the cathedral afloat.”“There was no choice” but to close, he said. “As you can well imagine, it was a time of sorrow.”In the cathedral’s last months, it held a celebration called “30 and Over” marking the longevity of some parishioners’ time there. When Lane polled those attending on how long they had been at the cathedral, “we had folks who had been there 70 years.”“For all of them,” he said, the cathedral’s closing “was heart-wrenching.”“Part of my task, my ministry, was to help folks live through it, not to be in denial about the grief … and to recognize that there’s not only death but resurrection, and we find resurrection sometimes in different places.“I will never be able to say too strongly how much I admire the people of St. John’s, how they lived through that grieving, but on the whole not letting that grief control their lives and their spiritual lives,” he said. “They could have let bitterness really take hold and control them, and they didn’t.”Some cathedral members began worshiping at the Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew in Wilmington, where he now is an associate priest. “That’s one of the reasons I came over here, to be with them through a time of transition. Some of them went other places, to other parishes.”The choir school relocated to Andrew and Matthew and is “still alive and well,” he said.Offering exemplary programs such as that is part of a cathedral’s role, he said. “I think the cathedral should exercise ministries that set an example and provide a teaching for parishes.”“On the other hand, it depends on the resources available to the cathedral,” he added, noting that in the Diocese of Delaware “parishes had far more resources in people and finances and clergy staff.”“In my mind, it doesn’t necessarily mean that because it’s a cathedral church it’s going to always be the prime example of urban ministry or teaching ministry or education, but that is certainly a function that it should strive to,” he said. And whatever it does, it should do everything possible to ensure that “whatever it does, do it very well.”“A cathedral dean,” he added, “needs to have his or her eye or hand on the pulse of the community.” And the dean must be willing to allow things to take place in a cathedral that a parish might not want, he said. “You need to provide opportunities for controversy to be expressed.”In Bethlehem, for example, they brought Palestinian and Israeli Jewish activists to preach and teach about issues of Israel and Palestine.“With a cathedral church, the dean also has to have a pastoral sense,” he said, concluding, “I’m not so sure that a dean is any different than a parish rector. But you definitely have to be open to the ministry of hospitality to the diocese and the ministry of prophetic ministry to the community.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 25, 2013 at 9:21 am Thank you for such a great article–about what it means to be serving as the interim when a church is closing. I have served in that situation, also–although it was NOT a cathedral, but a church in a small town in southeastern Nebraska–but some of the same dynamics were present! Side note–Bethlehem is close to my birthplace–Allentown–plus where I spent my early years–Bath. Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Deans Series 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (1) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Pr. 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