Top stories Earths darkest year errors in ocean study and a young

first_img Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’After analyzing volcanic glass particles in ice from a Swiss glacier, a team of researchers has identified why some medieval historians say 536 was the worst year to be alive. Early that year, a cataclysmic volcano in Iceland spewed ash across the Northern Hemisphere, creating a fog that plunged Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia into darkness—day and night—for 18 months. Summer temperatures dropped 1.5°C to 2.5°C, initiating the coldest decade in the past 2300 years.High-profile ocean warming paper to get a correction Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe (left to right): NICOLE SPAULDING/CCI FROM C. P. LOVELUCK ET AL., ANTIQUITY 10.15184, 4, 2018; DANIEL RAMIREZ/FLICKR; NASA SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION STUDIO Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Frankie SchembriNov. 16, 2018 , 3:40 PM Top stories: Earth’s darkest year, errors in ocean study, and a young crater under Greenland’s ice Scientists behind a major study on ocean warming this month are acknowledging errors in their calculations and say conclusions are not as certain as first reported. The research, published in Nature, said oceans are warming much faster than previously estimated. After a blog post flagged some discrepancies in the study, the authors said they would submit a correction to the journal.Massive crater under Greenland’s ice points to climate-altering impact in the time of humansAn international team of scientists this week reported the discovery of a 31-kilometer-wide impact crater hidden beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet, left after a 1.5-kilometer-wide asteroid slammed into Earth. One of the planet’s 25 largest-known craters, it is also remarkably fresh, seemingly indicating a recent strike within the last few million years. The timing is still up for debate, but some researchers on the discovery team believe the asteroid struck at a crucial moment: roughly 13,000 years ago, just as the world was thawing from the last ice age.Do gut bacteria make a second home in our brains?At the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego, California, last week, neuroanatomist Rosalinda Roberts made a splash with a presentation of results from her lab at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, in which bacteria was spotted inhabiting the cells of healthy human brains harvested from cadavers. Roberts was careful to note her team hasn’t ruled out the possibility of sample contamination, but the results are one of several preliminary indications that bacteria could directly influence processes in the brain.Large, strangely dim galaxy found lurking on far side of Milky WayAstronomers have discovered a dwarf galaxy, called Antlia 2, that is one-third the size of the Milky Way itself lurking on the far side of our galaxy. As big as the Large Magellanic Cloud, the galaxy’s largest companion, Antlia 2 eluded detection until now because it is 10,000 times fainter. Such a strange beast challenges models of galaxy formation and dark matter, the unseen stuff that helps pull galaxies together.last_img

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