In a Year of Protest Cries, Now It’s ‘Count Every Vote!’ and ‘Stop the Steal!’

first_img– Advertisement – Dozens of flag-waving Trump supporters looked on, and trucks with Trump flags circled the block, some gunning their engines and honking their horns.Mr. Grenell refused to answer questions, telling reporters, “Listen, you are here to take in information.” As reporters shouted questions, the speakers got into a van and drove away.Simon Romero reported from Phoenix, Shaila Dewan from New York and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio from Detroit. Contributing reporting were Dave Philipps from Las Vegas, Jannat Batra from Atlanta, Neil MacFarquhar and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs from New York, and Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Pranshu Verma from Washington.- Advertisement – Broadcasting on a hastily announced livestream, the former Nevada attorney general, Adam Laxalt, said Republicans had filed a lawsuit after discovering evidence of dead people and out-of-state voters illegally casting ballots in Nevada — but he did not provide any specifics to support those claims.“We’re asking the judge to, due to all of these irregularities, to stop the counting of improper votes,” he said.Mr. Laxalt was joined by Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union, and Ric Grenell, former acting director of national intelligence.- Advertisement –center_img On Wednesday, dozens of marchers had gathered at Washington’s Union Station with signs saying “the people have spoken” and “you will not silence us.” The protest included calls for justice on broader issues including race, immigration and climate change.Republican leaders appeared at some protests reviving oft-used claims of irregularities that have in the past been debunked or shown to be greatly exaggerated. Outside a nondescript warehouse in North Las Vegas where most of the uncounted votes in Clark County remain, they erected a podium in the street.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Asian shares set to dip as investors await key data

first_imgAsian shares looked set to open lower on Tuesday as investors shifted focus to upcoming data and central bank meetings although positive developments around potential COVID-19 vaccines and increased deal activity are likely to stem losses.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 futures were down 0.22 percent and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index futures lost 0.08 percent. Japan’s Nikkei 225 futures were flat after Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga won a ruling party leadership election, paving the way for him to succeed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.E-mini futures for the S&P 500 gained 0.11 percent. MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan ended up 1.06 percent.The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up 1.18 percent and the S&P 500 rose 1.27 percent while the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite added 1.87 percent.US stocks rose after drugmaker AstraZeneca said it resumed its British clinical trials of its COVID-19 vaccine, one of the most advanced in development. Pfizer Inc and US-listed shares of Germany’s BioNTech gained after proposing an expansion to regulators for their phase 3 trial to about 44,000 participants.Technology shares rallied after cloud services company Oracle said it would team up with China’s ByteDance to keep TikTok operating in the United States, beating Microsoft Corp in a deal structured as a partnership rather than an outright sale.Elsewhere, SoftBank Group jumped 8.96 percent to mark its biggest daily gain since March 25, after the company said it would sell chip designer Arm to Nvidia Corp for as much as US$40 billion in a deal set to reshape the semiconductor landscape.The US dollar dropped 2.2 percent against a basket of currencies, hitting a two-week low versus the yen, as demand for the safe haven currency eased amid the rise in equities.US crude recently rose 0.35 percent to $37.39 per barrel.Topics : On the economic data front, China’s industrial production and retail sales for August are expected to show an improving economy later on Tuesday. Chinese house price data for August is also due.“The global economic recovery is currently being driven by China’s fast rebound,” said Joseph Capurso, head of international economics at Commonwealth Bank of Australia. “As a result, market participants will likely be very sensitive to any downside surprises to the Chinese data.”US retail sales figures from August are due Wednesday.Investors will also look to central banks for direction, with the US Federal Reserve starting a two-day policy meeting on Tuesday, the first since unveiling a landmark shift to a more tolerant stance on inflation in August. The Bank of Japan and the Bank of England announce their respective policy decisions on Thursday.last_img read more