Egan says Billy Walsh doesn’t want to go to US

first_imgThe Wexford man, who resigned as head coach of the Irish High Performance Boxing Unit, is due to attend the US Olympic Trials taking place this month in Tennessee ahead of taking-up an offer to take charge of the Women’s Boxing squad for Rio2016.The Irish Amateur Boxing Association have yet to explain why they have refused to bow to pressure to give Walsh a new contract, which has forced him to quit Irish boxing.Former Irish Olympic silver medallist, Kenneth Egan has spoken to Walsh and said last night that he still believes that the situation can be salvaged.last_img

U-23 Team Arrive without Fanfare

first_imgFemi SolajaNigeria’s bronze-winning U-23 football team, tagged Dream Team VI, arrived the Murtala Muhammed International Airport Monday night without any official from the Sports Ministry or the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) welcoming them from Brazil.However, there were some handful of passionate fans and family members of the footballers who were at the airport to welcome the athletes. The Nigeria U-23 team were without key players like John Obi Mikel and William Troost-Ekong who flew directly back to their base in Europe.The footballers won the nation’s only medal following their 3-2 victory over Honduras in the third-placed match as Rio 2016 came to a close on Sunday.Twelve players and seven officials, including coach Samson Siasia, returned to the country while others had returned to their various clubs.Team captain John Obi Mikel had returned to Chelsea, while Haugesund defender Troost-Ekong, AS Trencin midfielder Kingsley Madu, Osmanlıspor’s Aminu Umar and AS Roma’s Sadiq Umar had also returned to their various clubs.Most of the fans at the airport were eager to see the footballers but were disappointed when they learnt that most of the foreign-based stars did not arrive with the team.Members of the Dream Team VI that arrived at the airport on Monday included, Olufemi Ajayi Junior, Saliu Popoola, Okechukwu Azubuike, Stanley Amuzie, Ndifreke Udo, Muenfuh Sincere and Ezekiel Imoh.The footballers and coach Siasia were lodged at the Sheraton Hotel, Ikeja and were expected to depart for their various destinations from Lagos yesterday as no official hosting plan has been announced for them by the NFF or the Ministry of Youth and Sports.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Messi accuses referees of favoring Brazil in Argentina’s Copa America semifinal defeat; ‘a lot of bulls—’

first_imgBut Messi was scathing of the performance from the Video Assistant Referee and match official Roddy Zambrano, using a postmatch interview to criticize the decision to not award a penalty to Sergio Aguero just prior to Firmino’s 71st-minute strike.”They were not better than us. They found the net early and the second goal came from a penalty [to Aguero] they didn’t award,” Messi told reporters.”They [the officials] had booked a lot of bulls—, but they didn’t even check the VAR. That’s incredible.”That happened all over the game. At the first glance of contact, they ruled in their [Brazil’s] favor and this kind of bulls— distracted us from the game.”There is no excuses for us, but we need to review this, analyze it and let’s hope CONMEBOL does something about it.”I think we played a great game. We made a great effort and they were not superior to us.”Argentina had 10 more shots at Brazilian goalkeeper Alisson than their opponents managed in attack (14-4) and struck the woodwork twice as they came agonizingly close to getting back into the contest.Aguero looped a header onto the crossbar with Alisson well-beaten in the first half shortly after Jesus earned the lead and Messi slammed a shot into the post in the second period after Lautaro Martinez’s drive was blocked. The Selecao took both of their chances clinically as Jesus and Firmino both side-footed into the net from close range after being teed up by the other.Brazil will host the winner of Wednesday’s semifinal between Chile and Peru in a final to be hosted Sunday at the Maracana.They will be aiming to win their first Copa America since triumphing in Venezuela during the 2007 edition. Lionel Messi has accused the referees of favoring Brazil as Argentina crashed out of the Copa America with a 2-0 defeat in the semifinal in Belo Horizonte.The Barcelona star again failed to have a decisive impact in the match for his nation as the hosts took the most of their opportunities with goals to Gabriel Jesus and Roberto Firmino in either half sealing a place in the final.last_img read more

Making time for history on an Ohio Century Farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseGrandkids interested in a treasure hunt, a grim prostate cancer diagnosis and a farmer with a long family history on the land — in 2016 it was time.Though he had been putting it off for years because there was always something more pressing, Rick Crawford finally decided that it was time to plod up the steps of the deteriorating old house on his family’s Adams County farm to investigate the old trunks filled with unknown farm history from generations gone by. They discovered the old house was full of critters and family memories.“To the best of my knowledge when Robert Richard — my great-great grandfather — moved here in 1875, that old log cabin was already here. When I was 7, my great grandfather died in 1960 and he was the last family member to live there. After that we rented it out. I was in and out of it after that when we were renting it, but I don’t think the tenants ever went upstairs. After they moved out, it just sat there and deteriorated. I knew there were things we probably should get out of there,” Rick said. “I always wondered what was in those trunks upstairs. I thought, ‘If I don’t do it, maybe nobody ever will.’”It was a fairly mild winter day and the Crawford grandchildren were really increasing the pressure to go explore the old house to search for treasures, so they did. That day, three living generations got a glimpse into the previous four generations of ancestors who farmed the land before them.“As we dug through it, it was interesting to see the history we were finding. We found the original paper with a wax seal on it from Samuel Crawford, who was the first family member we know about in Ohio. He came from Ireland to the U.S. in 1817, spent some time in Pennsylvania and Virginia and then came down the Ohio River to Adams County in 1825. He would have been my great-great-great grandfather. He was granted citizenship by one of the judges here in the County. We found letters from the Civil War, Christmas cards, bills, receipts, and tax documents — they made something like $500 in a whole year,” Rick said. “The grandkids enjoyed it and I was able to connect names and parcels of property here on the farm and better connect with my ancestors by doing that. I felt a connection I’d never had before. Some letters from the Civil War were still in the original envelopes. You can learn about the Civil War and go to Gettysburg, but this was actually my family members who were involved.”That mild winter day spent in the very old house got Rick started in the process of working to preserve some of the farm’s history through the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Ohio Historic Family Farms Program.“Having those letters and the original deeds kind of inspired me,” Rick said. “I didn’t realize all of the family we had and this helped me put it all together.”The first known parcel owned by the family was in timber at the time Samuel Crawford’s son Andrew purchased it in 1867, though it appears that the family may have owned adjacent properties even earlier. After this purchase, Andrew bought additional land and raised cattle, hogs, tobacco, wheat and hay.Andrew’s brother Robert Richard had two sons who fought and died in the Civil War, as described in the letters discovered in the old log cabin. Robert Richard had a total of 18 children. He had 12 children with his first wife, who passed away during childbirth with twins in 1860, and six more children with his second wife.Another son of Samuel served as First Lieutenant of Co. D in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry from July 25, 1862 through Oct. 11, 1864. He also purchased property now part of Crawford farms. Elza Mannering Crawford, born in 1873, was the last family member to live in the old log cabin that the Rick remembers as a child. Elza and his son, Albert, pushed for building the road that now runs to the farm to better connect with the outside world.“When the first family members came here there was an old horse and buggy road. You can still see traces of that road on our property. To get to town my great grandfather would ride a horse down through the woods to the Model T and they’d get back in the pitch dark and the horse would know how to get back through the woods in the dark,” Rick said. “They decided to pay for the survey and do the leg work to get a road put in on the high ground and it was first called Ellison Ridge Road. Back in the 60s the county took the road over and they changed it to Crawford Road because my grandfather played such a big part in getting this road here.”Albert’s son, Delbert Wayne Crawford, was Rick’s father.“My dad milked cows when I was young. It was grade C milk and we’d lift the milk cans into a cooler and the milkman would come and get the cans every other day. All the hay then was square bales. It seemed like the weather was better then and we would work four weeks straight baling hay every day in the summer and we can’t do that anymore. It seems like if we get one day of work in every week we are flying any more,” Rick said. “We always raised a little wheat, corn and hay. The corn was always ear picked. My father would tell us about the first tractor, I believe an 8N Ford, and when electricity came in 1948.“As I got near the age of graduating from high school and I wasn’t there to help with the hay, dad bought a round baler. Now we have evolved with the hay and we do it mechanized with an accumulator that goes behind a nearly new square baler and it’s got a preservative applicator and everything on it. Then we pick up 10 bales at a time and if everything is working right, we never touch a bale of hay. We still have a good many round bales we make and we are doing most of it from the seat of a tractor these days.”Today Rick and his son, Sam — there is a Samuel in every generation of Crawfords on the farm — raise around 150 acres of hay that is mostly sold to the local Amish community and they grow just enough corn to feed their stocker cattle and the deer for the hunting business on the farm’s 720 acres that was started to replace tobacco income for the farm. Tobacco was grown all of the years the Crawford family has been on the farm until 2005.“The tobacco companies were wanting bigger producers. We were growing 7 to 11 acres and that could produce 20,000 to 24,000 pounds of tobacco. That requires a lot of labor. I was wanting to downsize and the companies wanted me to raise more,” Crawford said. “We decided to quit raising tobacco and I ran into a guy in town who was leasing out rights for deer hunting. I had never heard of that before then. Now we sell six-day archery hunts and the lodging, up to 10 hunts a year.”Plenty has changed for the Crawford family farm since 1867, but thanks to that winter day in 2016 when Rick and his family took the time to peer into the past, a connection to the farm’s history was re-established.“I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and I may not be around all that much longer. I don’t feel like I own these deeds. I am just the current caretaker. Nobody owns the property, but the tax bill changes addresses every 20 or 30 years,” Rick said. “As I was researching all of this, I wished I would have done this a few years earlier when my dad was alive. He lived and breathed this farm. He never had a job a day in his life and he was never out of work. I think my dad would have been really interested in this.”In 2016, it was time. And, as it turns out, it was time well spent.Kristy, Sam, Rick and Patty Crawford stand along side of Crawford Road that runs through their farm in Adams County.last_img read more

Retirement Planning Over the Life Cycle

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, oneill@aesop.rutgers.eduThe Military Families Learning Network will host Retirement Ready? Effective Strategies for Military Families webinar on November 1. This 90-minute webinar will Include a segment about personal finances and how people at different stages of the life cycle view retirement planning.Join Retirement Ready? Effective Strategies for Military Families on Nov. 1 at 11 a.m. ET. Image created by Bari SobelsonAs described in a presentation by Professor William Klinger of Raritan Valley (NJ) Community College to the New Jersey Coalition for Financial Education, these generational reactions can be summarized as follows:Age 20-35– What, me, worry? I’ve got plenty of time.Age 35-55– Too many expenses. I’ll save later versus now.Age 55-70- Yikes! I have no savings. It’s catch-up time.Age 70+- How can I make my retirement savings last?At age 20-35, the key thing to remember is that time is on your side. For example, college students graduating at age 22 have 45 years of compound interest on their savings before they’re eligible for full Social Security benefits at age 67. In addition to saving early, it is also important to keep spending in check so that savings can get an early start. Some young adults, unfortunately, procrastinate by thinking “I’ll start saving later when I pay off student loans” or “I’ll save when I make more money.”In the “middle years,” age 35 to 55, emphasis should be on continued savings, especially in tax-deferred retirement savings accounts such as 401(k) and 403(b) plans. Be sure to take full advantage of the maximum available employer matching, such as 6% of your pay if you invest 6%, and track your annual progress by preparing a net worth statement that takes a “snapshot” of your current assets and debts.In later adulthood, age 55 to 70, people are (hopefully!) empty nesters and can accelerate their savings even further. According to research by Fidelity investments, people should have 5 times their salary saved at age 55, 6 times at age 60, 7 times at age 65, and 8 times at age 67 to be considered “on track” for a comfortable retirement. Unfortunately, the 2016 Retirement Confidence Survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute indicates that only 14% of workers have more than $250,000 saved for retirement and 54% have less than $25,000 in savings, including 26% that have less than 1,000.A primary retirement planning concern of people age 70+ is having their savings last throughout their lifetime. High health care and long-term care costs in later life are also major concerns. A body of research suggests that initially withdrawing 4% of savings (whatever the dollar amount) and increasing it annually for inflation has about an 85% success rate (i.e., chance of not running out of money) over a 30-year period based on past investment performance data. New research findings with “floor and ceiling” withdrawal strategies and “decision rules” (e.g., freezing income during periods of negative investment returns) have been shown to increase success rates even further.To summarize, retirement planning is important throughout adult life and can span a period lasting seven, or even eight, decades. Key messages for people of all generations are as follows:Start saving for retirement as early in life as possible. If it’s too late for you to get an early start, save as much as you can today and encourage your children and/or grandchildren to start saving early.Increase savings as income rises and/or expenses (e.g., child care) and/or debts (e.g., student loans) are reduced or end.Develop an adequate savings nest egg and a strategy for sustainable retirement savings withdrawals in later life. To plan your retirement savings, use the Ballpark Estimate.Enjoy the fruits of your labor in retirement and the journey of life along the way.Register today to join the November 1 webinar Retirement Ready? Strategies for Military Families. CEUs for accredited financial counselors, certified personal finance counselors, marriage and family counselors, social workers and counselors are available.last_img read more

Vincent Kompany highlights significance of Manchester derby

first_imgThe intense rivalry between neighbours and Premier League table toppers Manchester City and Manchester United makes their derby the biggest game of the season for the players, City captain Vincent Kompany has said ahead of Sunday’s clash.Both clubs have enjoyed stellar starts to the campaign with the Etihad outfit riding a 13-game winning streak to open up an eight-point lead and United losing just twice in 15 games to keep up their pursuit.The highly anticipated encounter could see City extend their advantage over second-placed United to 11 points and Kompany, who has first-hand experience of the ferocity of the derby, says there is more at stake than just points.Next up… pic.twitter.com/Y1GzK7LRd2- Manchester City (@ManCity) December 7, 2017″Not just to me but to every player it means more than any other game,” Kompany told the club’s website. (www.mancity.com)”I’m very honest about it. I do think in football people like to downplay the derbies, say it’s just another game, just another three points, but in reality it’s so much more than that and it always is.”The fixture is even more enticing as City are on the verge of a record-breaking 14 consecutive league wins while United are unbeaten in 40 games across all competitions at Old Trafford.City midfielder Fernandinho believes Paul Pogba’s absence through suspension could hinder the hosts but is expecting United to deal with the Frenchman’s exclusion and hold their own in a difficult fixture.”Of course, any team that loses such a good player, they are going to miss him,” the Brazilian told British media.advertisement”But Manchester United have good players and it doesn’t matter who is going to play in his position, they will do a good job. It will be a tough game for both teams.”Fellow midfielder Yaya Toure is wary of United’s counter-attacking threat but believes City will be ready defensively.”This year I think when you see United, they are going to be worried about us. That’s going to make them very dangerous on the counter-attack and we have to be ready for that,” Toure said.”It’s going to be a tough game, a derby is a derby…”We don’t want to lose… when I see United playing games against big teams, they always wait for a mistake to hit them on the counter-attack.”last_img read more

Really proud that everybody took initiative and responsibility: Shreyas Iyer

first_imgSumming up Delhi Capitals’ performance this season, skipper Shreyas Iyer said every player took initiative and responsibility before they fell just short of making their first ever IPL final, going down to Chennai Super Kings in Qualifier 2 in Visakhapatnam.Playing under a new name in this edition, Delhi Capitals managed to turn their fortunes around with coach Ricky Ponting and advisor Sourav Ganguly at the helm.”There are a lot of positives to talk about. At the start of the season with half of us youngsters in the team (but) Ricky, Sourav Ganguly came in and gave their views regarding how we would be going this season. Everyone was really enthusiastic to take forward from there on.”The way we started…right from the Mumbai game, Rishabh (Pant) started with a great knock and from there on every individual took responsibility. In the league phase we did amazing. Last season was really disappointing for us and the way we came out this year, everybody took that initiative and responsibility till this game,” Iyer said at the post-match press conference.Our #VIVOIPL 2019 journey comes to an end in Vizag. #CSKvDC #ThisIsNewDelhi #DelhiCapitals #IPL #IPL2019 pic.twitter.com/7UoZO7nF0IDelhi Capitals (@DelhiCapitals) May 10, 2019″Off the field also, we have gelled as a team and now it’s time to grow from here on. I am really proud the way we played this season. We’ve got a lot more to come next season,” he added.Delhi Capitals ended the league stage with 18 points, similar points as finalists Mumbai Indian and Chennai Super Kings. They also managed to win their Eliminator against Sunrisers Hyderabad but could not cross the Qualifier 2 hurdle against the defending champions, losing by six wickets in Visakhapatnam on Friday night.advertisementDelhi were restricted to just 147 for nine but Iyer refused to blame the pitch for their dismal show with the bat.”It was not a very difficult wicket to bat on. We had a disappointing start, losing two wickets in the powerplay, and it was hard to recover from that. I thought that if I play few balls and take time, it doesn’t matter because I can capitalise later on. And I have done that in the past. I was taking my time and I thought Imran’s over was to go for.”It was right in the slot but I just mistimed it and we started losing wickets from there again. So it was a miscalculation which happened and it was a bad day for us,” explained the captain.”But can’t really complain about the wickets. We have played a lot of our games on slow wickets, we’ve been practising a lot, even the wickets we practice on in Delhi aren’t that safe for the batsmen because they have uneven bounce. As a professional, you can’t complain about the pitch. We lost two wickets and none of the batsmen clicked at the same time. It was a bad calculation for us,” he added.Ricky Ponting was a legendary captain and now has had an extraordinary impact as coach at @DelhiCapitals !Captain Shreyas Iyer describes Ricky’s influence in a unique way #CSKvDC pic.twitter.com/tmSdgAvxdiIndianPremierLeague (@IPL) May 10, 2019The 24-year-old said that Delhi players were lucky to have Ponting as their coach.”Ponting is definitely a legend. Whenever he talks in the dressing room, no one has to talk after that. Because if someone does that, it’s of no use. The way he talks, it’s just like a song or a rap. He’s got that flow and he’s been doing it for 20 years.”As youngsters, we are really happy and lucky to have him as our coach. The positivity that he spreads, the freedom that he gives to every player is something out of the box. That’s what we need as youngsters. We need someone to support us and back us. That’s what we get from Ricky,” said Iyer.Also Read | We’ve found the base, now is the time to grow: Shreyas Iyer after DC exit IPL 2019last_img read more