ONE Championship hopes to tap into India market

first_imgJo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson ONE Championship, the premier mixed martial arts outfit in Asia, is looking to expand its continental influence further.After chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong had a private audience with Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the MMA promotion now looks to tap into the market of the Indian subcontinent.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Ateneo, NU keep perfect slates in UAAP juniorscenter_img Sityodtong was in India to at the 2017 Global Entrepreneur Summit and took the opportunity to have a private conversation with Modi.In a statement, Sityodtong discussed with Modi how India can become one of the biggest markets for ONE Championship.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSityodtong also gave Modi a plaque of appreciation and a pair of ONE Championship gloves.Although India is the second-most populous Asian country behind China with almost 1.2 billion people, it has yet to hold a ONE card and the promotion hopes Sityodtong’s conversation with Modi could forge the path. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

UWC takes the lead in physics research

first_imgA team of students from the University of Western Cape (UWC), led by Professor Nico Orce, is the first African research team to lead an experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).The day when the shosholoza was sung inside the heart of CERN! (Image: Nico Orce)Sulaiman PhilipBetter known as the home of the Large Hadron Collider, CERN is one of the most prestigious science research facilities in the world. It attracts the crème de la crème of international researchers, and now a team from UWC has joined their ranks.Led by the university’s Professor Nico Orce, the team of postgraduate students fired a selenium beam into a platinum target. The idea was to smash two nuclei into each other in the hope of causing an excitation in the selenium isotope.Selenium 70 lives for about 42 minutes and is produced during x-ray bursts, most commonly found in the stellar explosions of neutron stars. The new research facility at CERN, the Isotope Separator On-Line facility (ISOLDE), has an unstable selenium beam that is necessary for the experiments the UWC team is undertaking.UWC PhD student Kenzo Abrahams at CERN setting up the experiment. (Image: Nico Orce)South Africa joined the Isolde Collaboration — an agreement between nations and CERN to conduct experiments in the fields of nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, materials science and life sciences — in 2017. This allows the country to benefit from ISOLDE’s beams of unstable exotic particles, such as selenium 70 and germanium 66.Orce explains: “So far, we can only accelerate stable beams at iThemba LABS, so we needed to go to CERN to complete these experiments. Soon enough we may be doing these kinds of measurements for the first time at iThemba LABS, here in South Africa. That will be great.”At the South African facility, in Somerset West, scientists in the physical, medical and biologial sciences undertake research for advanced education, the treatment of cancers and the production of unique radioisotopes.The goal of the UWC experiment was to discover how unstable exotic elements were created. “Above iron ore we do not know how elements are produced. Question marks still remain over how these elements are created,” says the professor.The team’s experiments did not produce the results for which they had hoped; however, instead of selenium 70, they were able to measure the creation of a different exotic particle, germanium 66. “We can still say we were successful. It’s the first time that germanium 66 was produced on Earth. We were able to study the decay of germanium 66 until we find a stable isotope.”Science, Orce says, “is like fighting Mike Tyson. You jab and jab until you can land a clean shot.”The small peak on the right is the first excitation in 66Ge. Evidence of the UWC teams success. (Image: Nico Orce)The benefits to UWC and the countryTo encourage his students to reach for the stars, Orce, a Spaniard, uses the experience of the Spanish team that won the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The team that arrived in the country were underdogs. “We made history because we believed in ourselves. Afterwards the team were feared, respected.”The physics postgraduate programme at UWC consists of 50 previously disadvantaged students. It attracts, Orce says, not necessarily the best students but they all dream of lifting themselves up. To encourage their dreams he insisted that the best of his students were part of his research team.“I wanted them to know that dreams come true if you work hard. I believe that having them work with the best scientists will show them the world beyond their own circumstances. It was life changing. Some of these students will be professors one day.”In an interview with the CERN newsletter, Master’s student Senamile Masango said: “I am a role model now. You will hardly find any women doing physics in South Africa, and you will hardly find any black physicists. Nico treats us all equally and he’s making us hungry to break every barrier. We’re making history.”As the lead research team, the UWC students and their professor were responsible for setting parameters and monitoring controls. Team member Sifiso Ntshangase was team leader, which gives him the opportunity to suggest further experiments that can be conducted at CERN. “There is a responsibility that goes along with being the first African team, of being from UWC. We will keep proposing new experiments; we want to go back.”Going back is not simply a matter of proposing innovative experiments, however. To run the facilities at CERN is expensive. Orce explains: “To get beam time is not easy, or cheap. It costs €100,000 (R1.5-million) per day. We have to thank the Department of Science and Technology for helping to make our trip possible.”It was important that the team from UWC led the research, he adds. Now that the experiment is completed, teams from UWC and their research partners at the University of York in the UK will analyse the data before publishing results in scientific journals. “We will be lead authors. This will impact on the quality of visiting professors we can attract. Already we have leading nuclear physicists interested in doing a sabbatical at the university.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Making time for history on an Ohio Century Farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseGrandkids interested in a treasure hunt, a grim prostate cancer diagnosis and a farmer with a long family history on the land — in 2016 it was time.Though he had been putting it off for years because there was always something more pressing, Rick Crawford finally decided that it was time to plod up the steps of the deteriorating old house on his family’s Adams County farm to investigate the old trunks filled with unknown farm history from generations gone by. They discovered the old house was full of critters and family memories.“To the best of my knowledge when Robert Richard — my great-great grandfather — moved here in 1875, that old log cabin was already here. When I was 7, my great grandfather died in 1960 and he was the last family member to live there. After that we rented it out. I was in and out of it after that when we were renting it, but I don’t think the tenants ever went upstairs. After they moved out, it just sat there and deteriorated. I knew there were things we probably should get out of there,” Rick said. “I always wondered what was in those trunks upstairs. I thought, ‘If I don’t do it, maybe nobody ever will.’”It was a fairly mild winter day and the Crawford grandchildren were really increasing the pressure to go explore the old house to search for treasures, so they did. That day, three living generations got a glimpse into the previous four generations of ancestors who farmed the land before them.“As we dug through it, it was interesting to see the history we were finding. We found the original paper with a wax seal on it from Samuel Crawford, who was the first family member we know about in Ohio. He came from Ireland to the U.S. in 1817, spent some time in Pennsylvania and Virginia and then came down the Ohio River to Adams County in 1825. He would have been my great-great-great grandfather. He was granted citizenship by one of the judges here in the County. We found letters from the Civil War, Christmas cards, bills, receipts, and tax documents — they made something like $500 in a whole year,” Rick said. “The grandkids enjoyed it and I was able to connect names and parcels of property here on the farm and better connect with my ancestors by doing that. I felt a connection I’d never had before. Some letters from the Civil War were still in the original envelopes. You can learn about the Civil War and go to Gettysburg, but this was actually my family members who were involved.”That mild winter day spent in the very old house got Rick started in the process of working to preserve some of the farm’s history through the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Ohio Historic Family Farms Program.“Having those letters and the original deeds kind of inspired me,” Rick said. “I didn’t realize all of the family we had and this helped me put it all together.”The first known parcel owned by the family was in timber at the time Samuel Crawford’s son Andrew purchased it in 1867, though it appears that the family may have owned adjacent properties even earlier. After this purchase, Andrew bought additional land and raised cattle, hogs, tobacco, wheat and hay.Andrew’s brother Robert Richard had two sons who fought and died in the Civil War, as described in the letters discovered in the old log cabin. Robert Richard had a total of 18 children. He had 12 children with his first wife, who passed away during childbirth with twins in 1860, and six more children with his second wife.Another son of Samuel served as First Lieutenant of Co. D in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry from July 25, 1862 through Oct. 11, 1864. He also purchased property now part of Crawford farms. Elza Mannering Crawford, born in 1873, was the last family member to live in the old log cabin that the Rick remembers as a child. Elza and his son, Albert, pushed for building the road that now runs to the farm to better connect with the outside world.“When the first family members came here there was an old horse and buggy road. You can still see traces of that road on our property. To get to town my great grandfather would ride a horse down through the woods to the Model T and they’d get back in the pitch dark and the horse would know how to get back through the woods in the dark,” Rick said. “They decided to pay for the survey and do the leg work to get a road put in on the high ground and it was first called Ellison Ridge Road. Back in the 60s the county took the road over and they changed it to Crawford Road because my grandfather played such a big part in getting this road here.”Albert’s son, Delbert Wayne Crawford, was Rick’s father.“My dad milked cows when I was young. It was grade C milk and we’d lift the milk cans into a cooler and the milkman would come and get the cans every other day. All the hay then was square bales. It seemed like the weather was better then and we would work four weeks straight baling hay every day in the summer and we can’t do that anymore. It seems like if we get one day of work in every week we are flying any more,” Rick said. “We always raised a little wheat, corn and hay. The corn was always ear picked. My father would tell us about the first tractor, I believe an 8N Ford, and when electricity came in 1948.“As I got near the age of graduating from high school and I wasn’t there to help with the hay, dad bought a round baler. Now we have evolved with the hay and we do it mechanized with an accumulator that goes behind a nearly new square baler and it’s got a preservative applicator and everything on it. Then we pick up 10 bales at a time and if everything is working right, we never touch a bale of hay. We still have a good many round bales we make and we are doing most of it from the seat of a tractor these days.”Today Rick and his son, Sam — there is a Samuel in every generation of Crawfords on the farm — raise around 150 acres of hay that is mostly sold to the local Amish community and they grow just enough corn to feed their stocker cattle and the deer for the hunting business on the farm’s 720 acres that was started to replace tobacco income for the farm. Tobacco was grown all of the years the Crawford family has been on the farm until 2005.“The tobacco companies were wanting bigger producers. We were growing 7 to 11 acres and that could produce 20,000 to 24,000 pounds of tobacco. That requires a lot of labor. I was wanting to downsize and the companies wanted me to raise more,” Crawford said. “We decided to quit raising tobacco and I ran into a guy in town who was leasing out rights for deer hunting. I had never heard of that before then. Now we sell six-day archery hunts and the lodging, up to 10 hunts a year.”Plenty has changed for the Crawford family farm since 1867, but thanks to that winter day in 2016 when Rick and his family took the time to peer into the past, a connection to the farm’s history was re-established.“I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and I may not be around all that much longer. I don’t feel like I own these deeds. I am just the current caretaker. Nobody owns the property, but the tax bill changes addresses every 20 or 30 years,” Rick said. “As I was researching all of this, I wished I would have done this a few years earlier when my dad was alive. He lived and breathed this farm. He never had a job a day in his life and he was never out of work. I think my dad would have been really interested in this.”In 2016, it was time. And, as it turns out, it was time well spent.Kristy, Sam, Rick and Patty Crawford stand along side of Crawford Road that runs through their farm in Adams County.last_img read more

Tracking Influenza: Google Flu Trends Now Covers 16 More Countries

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting frederic lardinois 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Google#news#web Google just announced a major expansion of its Flu Trends program which monitors searches for Flu-related symptoms on Google’s search engine to predict Flu outbreaks. Until now, Google only made the data it gathered from searches in the U.S., Mexico, Australia and New Zealand available, but now, Google has expanded the product to cover 16 more countries, including Russia, Norway, Sweden, Germany, France, Poland and Spain.Flu Trends launched last November, and a lot of people were skeptical about whether Google’s data could really be used to track the spread of the flu. According to Google’s own research (PDF), which was published in Nature earlier this year, Flu Trends had a 0.92 correlation with the official flu data. Now, with the help of data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Google was also able to validate its models for flu-related queries in Europe. The official data is usually a week or two behind, but Google’s data is created in real time.Google has been very active in the Flu research community. Just a few weeks ago, the company also announced a partnership with the Public Library of Science, which now uses Google Knol to publish data and papers about influenza research.last_img read more

We want BHU campus to be a home away from home for girl students, says newly-appointed Chief Proctor Royana Singh

first_imgThe newly-appointed Chief Proctor of Banaras Hindu University Royana Singh says her priority will be the stationing of more security guards, particularly females, for the safety of girl students.What is your plan for the security of girl students as the new Chief Proctor of BHU?The security of girl students is our priority. It was our founder Mahamana Madan Mohan Malaviya’s dream to ensure safety and justice for students here. We want the campus to be a home away from home for girl students. For this, our vision is safe hostels and the presence of more guards, particularly women guards. The recruitment of women guards began under my predecessor but we plan to step up the process and recruit and station more female guards.One hears of a women’s curfew after 8 pm there, meaning they cannot go out of their hostels after that. How do you look at this?No, girls can come and go any time. However, they have to inform that they need to go out and also tell us where they are going. Their parents have sent them here with faith in us and this rule helps us ensure their safety better.But do you think such a rule is good? And would you want to either relax the time or extend this rule even before 8 pm?The 8 pm rule is good. Varanasi gets a bit secluded after that. It is not a big city like Delhi. Girls stay in the library, too, till late, once they have informed the warden. Guards are stationed near the library and often one guard is told to escort them to somewhere near their hostel.It is said that girls are not provided non-vegetarian food in their hostels, while boys’ hostels serve non-vegetarian food. Why is it so?Most girls in the hostels are vegetarian. They are uncomfortable with the idea of non-vegetarian food in the hostel and there have been such complaints. So, we have not kept it in the menu. But if a group of non-vegetarian girls tells the mess staff they want to eat it, it is arranged for them from outside.We also hear that wi-fi facility was extended to the girls’ hostels very recently, while it has been there in boys’ hostels for longer…No, it was there. But the wires got cut because of the construction of a boundary wall. Wi-fi facility has been brought back now.Is it true that sexual harassment cases in BHU have been on the rise in recent times?I am in charge of the women’s grievance cell. So, I can say it with certainty that under the present Vice-Chancellor such cases have come down.Police was called into the campus and videos show girl students were lathi-charged by male policemen. How do you explain that? Do you think it was a case of excesses being committed on students, particularly girl students?I was out of town and have just returned. I am not aware of the details and will have to find out.last_img read more

Buffer Zone defined for DHR in crucial meeting between Railways and UNESCO

first_imgDarjeeling: “There is no threat to the heritage status accorded to the Darjeeling Himalayan Railways,” stated Sanjiv Rai, General Manager, North-east Frontier Railways, while talking to media persons following a two-day meeting with the UNESCO representatives in Darjeeling. The UNESCO representatives dubbed the meeting as a landmark one and added that it agreed on defining and agreeing on a buffer zone that is one of the most important components of conserving the world heritage railway. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja “It was a very fruitful meeting. Though the DHR has been enjoying the world heritage tag for the past 20 years, the boundary of the heritage had not been defined and hence protecting it was a challenging task. In this landmark meeting, the Railways agreed to the Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan (CCMP) team’s proposal of creating a buffer zone. The boundary discussion ended fruitfully in this meeting. The other stakeholders have to be proactive in the conservation and protection of this world heritage also. All the stakeholders including the local community need to come together for this,” stated Junhi Han, Chief, Culture Department and Programme Specialist, UNESCO, New Delhi. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway She appealed to all the stakeholders including the state government, Gorkhaland Territorial Administration, the municipality, Forest department and the PWD to come together for this noble task. Commenting on the issue of land encroachment along the tracks, Junhi Han said: “There is no quick solution to this as people’s lives are involved. There has to be a long term plan which should involve the other stakeholders. However, it has to be ensured that no further encroachment takes place,” she remarked. She also stated that the Indian Railways is committed and open to understanding that this industrial heritage also includes the old buildings like staff quarters, printing press and workshops. “They accepted this and even assured us that redundant components could be transformed into museums and community centres,” stated Han. Echoing similar sentiments, Ravinder Kumar Verma, Divisional Railway Manager, Katihar Division, maintained: “Heritage is not the track alone. The Hill Cart Road on which the DHR runs is also part of the heritage. The buffer zone will maintain the scenic beauty along the route. Any construction in the buffer zone has to confirm with the heritage nature. Other stakeholders will have to see this. We will also take up the matter of encroachment with the state and the local authorities.” Regarding work on the DHR, Verma stated that the revamped Ghayabari and Sonda stations will become operational before the end of this month. “20 to 25 new coaches will be introduced soon. 20 km of sleepers will be changed.” Adding to this, the GM stated: “The joy ride services of the DHR has witnessed a surge of 50% passengers than previous years. Vistadome coaches have been introduced along with AC coaches.” In 1879, work first started on the DHR, then called the Darjeeling Steam Tramways. DHR was titled as a world heritage site by UNESCO on December 2, 1999.last_img read more

Two more women file sexassault complaints against Gilbert Rozon

first_imgMONTREAL – Two more Quebec women have filed official complaints of sexual assault against Just For Laughs founder Gilbert Rozon.They are TV personality Penelope McQuade, 46, and actress Patricia Tulasne, 58.They are two of the 10 women who accused Rozon last week of sexual harassment or sexual assault.News of the police complaints comes a day after TV star Julie Snyder filed a similar complaint with authorities.McQuade’s agent, Julie Bergeron, said today there will be no other immediate comment because of the ongoing legal process. McQuade, 46, has previously said Rozon allegedly attacked her in 1997 when she was covering the Just For Laughs comedy festival.Rozon founded Just For Laughs in 1983 and was serving as president when he resigned last week as news of the allegations surfaced.He also stepped down as vice-president of the Montreal Chamber of Commerce and as head of the committee behind Montreal’s 375th-anniversary celebrations.last_img read more

Guy Ouellette steps away from Quebec Liberals following arrest

first_imgQUEBEC – A longtime Liberal member of the Quebec legislature stepped away from the party on Thursday following his arrest by the province’s anti-corruption unit.Guy Ouellette, 65, was arrested in connection with an investigation by the unit, known as UPAC, into an important information leak to the media last April, a government source told The Canadian Press.In a statement, the Liberals said Ouellette would step aside temporarily pending the outcome of proceedings involving the province’s director of criminal and penal prosecutions.Ouellette, a former organized crime investigator turned politician, has represented the riding of Chomedey, north of Montreal, since 2007.The anti-corruption unit explained it executed six warrants in an investigation targeting breach of trust and obstruction of justice.The unit said officers made an arrest “to secure evidence and to prevent the offences from continuing or recurring.”UPAC said it wouldn’t identify anyone implicated because no charges have yet been filed.Radio-Canada reported that UPAC investigators tricked Ouellette into a meeting by sending him a text from the phone of a retired police officer.Sources told the network the investigators seized the officer’s phone as part of the probe into the information leaks and contacted Ouellette, using the pretext the officer was getting ready to reveal what he knew to a local newspaper.Premier Philippe Couillard cancelled events in northern Quebec on Thursday to be at the legislature for a special caucus meeting and to attend question period.Couillard said Ouellette was right to step aside, but said he didn’t have any further details for the gaggle of reporters outside the Liberal meeting room.The premier said he was in a hotel room in Chibougamau on Wednesday when a staffer informed him of news of the arrest, which was first reported by Montreal La Presse.While Couillard hadn’t spoken to Ouellette directly as of Thursday morning, Liberal caucus chair Filomena Rotiroti said she was shaken when Ouellette told her he was withdrawing from caucus.“Guy has always been a team player and while light is shed on the matter, he took a decision to step aside,” Rotiroti said, standing alongside Couillard.Couillard said the shock extends to all political parties but added that Ouellette’s departure won’t destabilize his government.“It surprises us, it saddens us, but it doesn’t deviate us from the plan,” Couillard said.Ouellette’s arrest is allegedly linked to a UPAC probe called Machurer, which looked into suspected illegal financing within the Liberal party under former leader Jean Charest.UPAC has been investigating leaks from within its own organization.A leak last April revealed UPAC had been investigating the comings and goings of ex-premier Charest and Liberal fundraiser Marc Bibeau up until 2016.A news organization published emails dating from 2011 between Bibeau, Jean-Louis Dufresne, the former chief of staff to Premier Philippe Couillard, and Hugo d’Amour, a spokesperson for Charest. The emails showed the men discussed a contract to repair a Montreal-area bridge.Ouellette came out publicly in April to denounce the major information leak, which proved embarrassing to the Liberals.He said at the time he was “disgusted by the situation, disgusted by all these leaks, disgusted by all these conflicts of interest.”Ouellette was head of the legislature committee that recently held hearings into the leaks.The reactions from Quebec politicians were mostly measured.“I don’t know if there was an arrest or just questioning,” said Parti Quebecois public security critic Pascal Berube.“I saw the images that show police officers entering Mr. Ouellette’s residence in Quebec City.“Until I know what he’s accused of, I don’t want to speculate any further. I don’t want to condemn a fellow member.”Quebec solidaire member Amir Khadir expressed support for Ouellette, who he described as a possible whistleblower.“Guy Ouellette must know this morning that he has my respect and my support,” Khadir said. “I have no reason to doubt his integrity, his honesty.”UPAC should be focusing less on “hunting sources” and more on bringing down those responsible for the alleged illegal Liberal fundraising, Khadir added.last_img read more