Corporations and Foreign Nations Pivot to Lobby Biden

first_imgPrecision Strategies, the self-described “integrated strategy and marketing agency” co-founded by Mr. Biden’s campaign manager and incoming deputy White House chief of staff, Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, was retained starting in August to do public relations work by the American Investment Council, a lobbying group representing private equity firms.One of the most prominent of these firms is SKDK, which provides communications and fund-raising advice to corporate, political and foreign clients, including the Biden campaign, a super PAC started by the former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, and an Israeli spyware firm. (SKDK has registered under lobby laws in the past, but it says that was for public affairs consulting and that it does not lobby.) Others well positioned to profit in the Biden era include the lobbying firm owned by Jeff Ricchetti, the brother of Mr. Biden’s campaign chairman and incoming White House counselor, Steve Ricchetti, and a firm co-founded by Jeffrey Peck, who worked on the Senate Judiciary Committee under Mr. Biden and served as treasurer of the Biden Foundation.Mr. Peck deregistered as a lobbyist early this year, but the firm that bears his name continues to do a brisk lobbying business, adding clients like the International Franchise Association in the months before the election.The Biden administration is also expected to generate new business for firms with connections to Mr. Biden or his team that help clients get their way in Washington without formally registering to lobby — including WestExec Advisors and Albright Stonebridge Group, as well as Beacon Global Strategies. Beacon Global, which has represented Raytheon and Citi among other clients, was co-founded by Jeremy Bash, a former Obama Defense Department official who has worked closely with Mr. Biden’s newly named White House chief of staff, Ron Klain.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Ms. Podesta, who runs a lobbying firm with dozens of corporate clients, including Apple and Yelp, said she had seen a surge in interest in her Democratic-leaning firm, signing up new clients in recent weeks in advance of an expected Biden win. “The real shift will come in December,” she said. “It takes a while for Fortune 500 companies to make these decisions.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg misses oral arguments due to stomach bug

first_imgYinYang/iStock(WASHINGTON) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was not on the bench for oral arguments Wednesday due to a stomach bug, according to the court.The court’s oldest justice, 86, is recovering at home, a spokesperson said.“But she will participate in the consideration and decision of the cases on the basis of the briefs and the transcripts or recordings of the oral arguments,” Chief Justice John Roberts said from the bench at the open of the day’s court session.Notably, Ginsburg is missing the justices’ Wednesday conference to discuss and decide cases argued Tuesday — which were those challenging President Donald Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which President Barack Obama created in 2012 to provide temporary legal status and work permits to immigrants.At issue in the DACA case is whether the Trump administration followed federal law requiring agencies to base policy changes on sound reasoning that is explained to the public. Lower courts ruled that the decision to end DACA was “arbitrary and capricious,” in violation of law.During Tuesday’s oral arguments, the court’s conservative members — including the newest members of the court, Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch — seemed inclined to overturn the lower court decision. Overturning the decision would allow the Trump administration to carry on with canceling DACA.Ginsburg and her fellow liberal colleagues, however, pushed back. Ginsburg herself argued with the Trump administration’s Department of Homeland Security’s assumption that DACA is unconstitutional, as outlined in two memos by two now-former homeland security secretaries.“Her whole memo is infected by the idea that this is, one, illegal. It leaves substantial doubt about its illegality,” she said, referring to the memo by Kirstjen Nielsen. “If we take that out, then — the independent ground that you’re asserting, then she would be saying, we stand up and say this is the policy of our administration. We don’t like DACA and we’re taking responsibility for that, instead of trying to put the blame on the law.”Trump Solicitor General Noel Francisco replied that he “very much disagree[d]” with that assessment.Justice Stephen Breyer, meanwhile, suggested a possible middle ground by crafting an opinion that buys time for policymakers to address DACA recipients’ status.This is Ginsburg’s second absence from a public court session in the past year. Last December she took leave after undergoing cancer surgery, which was the first time in her 26 years on the bench she missed an argument. She was also treated for a localized malignant tumor on her pancreas in August before the court convened for the new term.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more