Making time for history on an Ohio Century Farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseGrandkids interested in a treasure hunt, a grim prostate cancer diagnosis and a farmer with a long family history on the land — in 2016 it was time.Though he had been putting it off for years because there was always something more pressing, Rick Crawford finally decided that it was time to plod up the steps of the deteriorating old house on his family’s Adams County farm to investigate the old trunks filled with unknown farm history from generations gone by. They discovered the old house was full of critters and family memories.“To the best of my knowledge when Robert Richard — my great-great grandfather — moved here in 1875, that old log cabin was already here. When I was 7, my great grandfather died in 1960 and he was the last family member to live there. After that we rented it out. I was in and out of it after that when we were renting it, but I don’t think the tenants ever went upstairs. After they moved out, it just sat there and deteriorated. I knew there were things we probably should get out of there,” Rick said. “I always wondered what was in those trunks upstairs. I thought, ‘If I don’t do it, maybe nobody ever will.’”It was a fairly mild winter day and the Crawford grandchildren were really increasing the pressure to go explore the old house to search for treasures, so they did. That day, three living generations got a glimpse into the previous four generations of ancestors who farmed the land before them.“As we dug through it, it was interesting to see the history we were finding. We found the original paper with a wax seal on it from Samuel Crawford, who was the first family member we know about in Ohio. He came from Ireland to the U.S. in 1817, spent some time in Pennsylvania and Virginia and then came down the Ohio River to Adams County in 1825. He would have been my great-great-great grandfather. He was granted citizenship by one of the judges here in the County. We found letters from the Civil War, Christmas cards, bills, receipts, and tax documents — they made something like $500 in a whole year,” Rick said. “The grandkids enjoyed it and I was able to connect names and parcels of property here on the farm and better connect with my ancestors by doing that. I felt a connection I’d never had before. Some letters from the Civil War were still in the original envelopes. You can learn about the Civil War and go to Gettysburg, but this was actually my family members who were involved.”That mild winter day spent in the very old house got Rick started in the process of working to preserve some of the farm’s history through the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Ohio Historic Family Farms Program.“Having those letters and the original deeds kind of inspired me,” Rick said. “I didn’t realize all of the family we had and this helped me put it all together.”The first known parcel owned by the family was in timber at the time Samuel Crawford’s son Andrew purchased it in 1867, though it appears that the family may have owned adjacent properties even earlier. After this purchase, Andrew bought additional land and raised cattle, hogs, tobacco, wheat and hay.Andrew’s brother Robert Richard had two sons who fought and died in the Civil War, as described in the letters discovered in the old log cabin. Robert Richard had a total of 18 children. He had 12 children with his first wife, who passed away during childbirth with twins in 1860, and six more children with his second wife.Another son of Samuel served as First Lieutenant of Co. D in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry from July 25, 1862 through Oct. 11, 1864. He also purchased property now part of Crawford farms. Elza Mannering Crawford, born in 1873, was the last family member to live in the old log cabin that the Rick remembers as a child. Elza and his son, Albert, pushed for building the road that now runs to the farm to better connect with the outside world.“When the first family members came here there was an old horse and buggy road. You can still see traces of that road on our property. To get to town my great grandfather would ride a horse down through the woods to the Model T and they’d get back in the pitch dark and the horse would know how to get back through the woods in the dark,” Rick said. “They decided to pay for the survey and do the leg work to get a road put in on the high ground and it was first called Ellison Ridge Road. Back in the 60s the county took the road over and they changed it to Crawford Road because my grandfather played such a big part in getting this road here.”Albert’s son, Delbert Wayne Crawford, was Rick’s father.“My dad milked cows when I was young. It was grade C milk and we’d lift the milk cans into a cooler and the milkman would come and get the cans every other day. All the hay then was square bales. It seemed like the weather was better then and we would work four weeks straight baling hay every day in the summer and we can’t do that anymore. It seems like if we get one day of work in every week we are flying any more,” Rick said. “We always raised a little wheat, corn and hay. The corn was always ear picked. My father would tell us about the first tractor, I believe an 8N Ford, and when electricity came in 1948.“As I got near the age of graduating from high school and I wasn’t there to help with the hay, dad bought a round baler. Now we have evolved with the hay and we do it mechanized with an accumulator that goes behind a nearly new square baler and it’s got a preservative applicator and everything on it. Then we pick up 10 bales at a time and if everything is working right, we never touch a bale of hay. We still have a good many round bales we make and we are doing most of it from the seat of a tractor these days.”Today Rick and his son, Sam — there is a Samuel in every generation of Crawfords on the farm — raise around 150 acres of hay that is mostly sold to the local Amish community and they grow just enough corn to feed their stocker cattle and the deer for the hunting business on the farm’s 720 acres that was started to replace tobacco income for the farm. Tobacco was grown all of the years the Crawford family has been on the farm until 2005.“The tobacco companies were wanting bigger producers. We were growing 7 to 11 acres and that could produce 20,000 to 24,000 pounds of tobacco. That requires a lot of labor. I was wanting to downsize and the companies wanted me to raise more,” Crawford said. “We decided to quit raising tobacco and I ran into a guy in town who was leasing out rights for deer hunting. I had never heard of that before then. Now we sell six-day archery hunts and the lodging, up to 10 hunts a year.”Plenty has changed for the Crawford family farm since 1867, but thanks to that winter day in 2016 when Rick and his family took the time to peer into the past, a connection to the farm’s history was re-established.“I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and I may not be around all that much longer. I don’t feel like I own these deeds. I am just the current caretaker. Nobody owns the property, but the tax bill changes addresses every 20 or 30 years,” Rick said. “As I was researching all of this, I wished I would have done this a few years earlier when my dad was alive. He lived and breathed this farm. He never had a job a day in his life and he was never out of work. I think my dad would have been really interested in this.”In 2016, it was time. And, as it turns out, it was time well spent.Kristy, Sam, Rick and Patty Crawford stand along side of Crawford Road that runs through their farm in Adams County.last_img read more

Ohio industry leaders join together to denounce tariff increase

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt Buchenroth, Zach Parrott and Joel PenhorwoodTariffs Hurt the Heartland — the nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs — in conjunction with the Council of the Great Lakes Region, hosted a town hall this week in Cleveland at the 2019 Great Lakes Economic Forum.The event featured a discussion with Ohio business owners, manufacturers and farmers on the impact of tariffs on the state’s economy. The conversation came one day after President Trump announced that he will be increasing tariffs substantially this week.The group released the following statement regarding the tweet announcement that tariffs on $200 billion of goods will increase from 10 to 25% on Friday.“For 10 months, Americans have been paying the full cost of the trade war, not China. To be clear, tariffs are taxes that Americans pay, and this sudden increase with little notice will only punish U.S farmers, businesses and consumers,” Tariffs Hurt the Heartland said in the statement. “If the President follows through on this threat, the consequences will be dire. Raising tariffs to 25% could cost nearly one million American jobs, according to recent estimates. This decision will also roil financial markets and increase the likelihood of retaliation on American farmers who are facing the lowest income levels in years.”A recent study by the non-partisan economic research firm the Trade Partnership found that if tariffs are increased to 25% it would result in 29,100 job losses in Ohio.Tadd Nicholson, executive director of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association, talked with Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood following the meeting.Listen to the full interview here Audio Playerhttps://www.ocj.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/190507_TaddNicholson_TariffsHurtTheHeartland.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“Trade has always been a simple thing in agriculture,” Nicholson said during the group conversation. “We know that we can outcompete in production of food in the world. When there is a tariff coming, that means that there is some form of retaliation. The retaliation will quickly affect agricultural products like soybeans, corn and wheat. If the price of soybean plummets, because of a trade war with China, it causes a overproduction of another product like corn, and low profitability of soybean. The impact is compounded. The livestock industry is also affected, because our corn and soybean goes into the feed of livestock animals. “Agriculture needs a win. We are in a depressed economic state. Any benefit we see in the future will come from trades and exports with other countries.”Agriculture isn’t the only industry seeing hard times in part because of tariffs. The motor industry has recently stepped out with their perspective, especially since Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana lead the way for employment in automobile manufacturing.“Twenty percent of employment has grown in the midwest, because of vehicle manufacturing and production has grown, as well as investments from the suppliers,” said Ann Wilson, senior vice president, Government Affairs, Motor, and Equipment Manufacturers Association. “Steel and aluminum tariffs raise the price of domestic steel and aluminum has increased 50% from last year. Most developers are small manufacturers. They have to pay more for their inputs of steel. President Trump has a study on his desk, that has not been made public that could put a 25% tariff on all imported automobile parts. Companies like O’Reilly and NAPA are not investing in the United States, including Ohio, because of the uncertainty whether or not they can make imports. Employment will decrease and consumer prices will increase.”The beverages industry has also seen some troubling results, according to Cleveland Whiskey founder and CEO Tom Lix.“In 2017, 15% of business came from exports to the UK, they were predicted to go up to 20% by 2018. By 2018 there was not a single bottle of Cleveland Whiskey sold in Europe. The tariff causes the prices on the whiskey to be marked up. The tariff caused the whiskey prices to be increased by 50%. Cleveland Whiskey had to fire two employees, because they could not afford to have them,” Lix said. “We buy things from around the world everyday and it is crazy to me that we aren’t encouraging those kinds of trades. The fact that we are manipulating these trade deals and using it as a political tool is absolutely absurd, and it hurts a whole lot of people. Mark my words, the economy won’t stay this good forever. We are making things worse for ourselves.”The group was also joined by Ed Brzytwa, director of international trade for the American Chemistry Council as well as Mark Fisher of the Council of the Great Lakes Region and Farmers for Free Trade co-founder Angela Marshall Hofmann.last_img read more

10 months agoSpain coach Luis Enrique praises Real Madrid midfielder Isco; but also warns…

first_imgSpain coach Luis Enrique praises Real Madrid midfielder Isco; but also warns…by Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSpain coach Luis Enrique says he remains a fan of Real Madrid midfielder Isco.While he has struggled at club level this season, Enrique has included Isco in every squad he has selected since taking charge.He said, “I like Isco very much. He is a player who in the last World Cup was at a very high level and maybe he was the best player of the national team. “His quality nobody is going to discuss it, but his state of form and minutes of play will indicate the possibilities he has in the national team. “Isco has been selected in all six games and played in most of them. More than my words, you have to look at the facts.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer ready for ex-teammates media gauntlet: An easy ride?

first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer ready for ex-teammates media gauntlet: An easy ride?by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United caretaker boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is ready to run a gauntlet of former teammates in the media.Ex-United stars attacked Jose Mourinho over his negative tactics, his public rows with Paul Pogba and other first-team stars.Solskjaer said: “I won’t get an easy ride. Do you think Gary Neville will ever give anyone an easy ride?“I sat next to Gary for 11 years in the dressing room and he is different class. He is paid to be a pundit now and I think he is fantastic at his job. Gary is unbelievable.“But he has been a manager as well. He was caretaker manager at Valencia, so he knows what position I’m in. He’s been a player, he’s been a manager, and now he’s a great pundit.“There’s also Scholsey, Rio, Keano. They all have strong opinions and are entitled to those opinions. But they know me as a person. They know how I work and how the club works, so they understand the decisions I will make. They understand that results don’t just come with a flick of my fingers.“But for me this job is about getting better performances and getting the team to improve. If the performances improve then the results will come. If not….then we’ll see.“Results have been mixed this season, but the Premier League has changed. When I played here we maybe had one challenger in Arsenal for a period and then Chelsea. Now there are five or six teams challenging, so it is a completely different competition.“I never thought I would be manager here so I’m just going to enjoy these five months and do the best I can. It’s about getting the fans smiling.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

9 months agoWillian admits ‘I don’t know if Chelsea want me to stay’

first_imgWillian admits ‘I don’t know if Chelsea want me to stay’by Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWillian admits he’s yet to hear from Chelsea about a new contract.The Blues turned down a £50million bid for the forward from Barcelona on Thursday, which would have seen £38m winger Malcom come to London in exchange. While Barca are expected to come in with another bid, Willian pledged his future to the club.The 30-year-old, who has 18 months left on his current deal, said: “My future is here. I have one-and-a-half years on my contract left, and I want to stay until it is finished.“I don’t know if the club want me to sign a new contract, but my focus is here. I would like a new contract. If they want it, I want it. I have been here for five-and-a-half years, won a lot of titles. I am very happy.“To play for Chelsea, you have to put your mind to winning titles every year.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Justise Winslow Turns Pro And Thanks Duke In Heartfelt Instagram Post

first_imgAs expected, Duke freshman forward Justise Winslow is entering the 2015 NBA Draft. He’s the second Blue Devil freshman to declare for the draft, joining big man Jahlil Okafor.Winslow acknowledged the news with an eloquent Instagram post moments ago.  I would like to thank Duke University for allowing me to be a part of such a prestigious institution where I have learned more about myself inside and outside of the classroom than I ever thought I could. I would like to thank the students of Duke University for allowing me to develop my character and be myself without any judgment. You all have made this year extremely entertaining. I would like to thank Coach K and the rest of the coaching staff for helping me become a better player mentally and physically. I would like to thank the entire Duke Basketball Program for accepting me with open arms and caring for me unconditionally. Lastly, I would like to thank my teammates who over the course of this past year have become my best friends, my brothers, and NATIONAL CHAMPIONS. Duke University will forever be in heart and I am proud to say that I am DUKE BLUE DEVIL for life.A photo posted by Justise Winslow (@_rubdi) on Apr 14, 2015 at 1:43pm PDTWinslow is expected to be chosen in the top 10 picks of June’s draft, perhaps even within the top five. The versatile 6-foot-6 Houston, Tex., native averaged 12.6 points, 6.5 rebounds and 2.1 assists in his lone season as a Blue Devil. With Winslow and Okafor both turning pro, attention shifts to freshman point guard Tyus Jones, who has yet to announce his intentions for next season but is a projected first-round pick if he foregoes his eligibility.last_img read more

Lille confirm massive pricetag on head of Arsenal target Nicolas Pepe

first_imgLille sporting director Luis Campos has broken silence over the future of rumoured Arsenal target Nicolas Pepe.Pepe, a 23-year-old pacey Ivorian winger has notched 12 goals and 5 assists across 19 league appearances for Lille.Coach of Premier League outfit Arsenal Unai Emery is having his sights set on attacking additions for the January transfer window and is he is hoping to sign the African dynamo.Speaking in an interview with Telefoot via 101greatgoals, Lille sporting director Luis Campos was unsurprisingly questioned on the future of his side’s star man.‘‘I hope he will stay this winter. We’ll do everything to keep him.’’Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…‘‘All the top clubs in the world have their eyes on him, and that’s normal, but the president has been clear.’’‘‘The idea is for him to continue at the club.’’‘‘In contrast, with my experience in football, I would say that if a club arrives with a big number and can convince the player… I would sell him for €80 million.’’‘‘That’s the price tag, but you’d have to convince the player and he’s been a big part of us being in second place.’’last_img read more

The Wilmington Insider For October 1 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Monday, October 1, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: A chance of showers, mainly after 2pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 61. Calm wind becoming northeast around 6 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.At Wilmington Public Schools: Superintendent Dr. Glenn Brand is holding a Community Meeting from 9:30am to 10:30am at the Woburn Street School. This is an opportunity for the community to provide Brand with feedback about the Wilmington Public Schools. The Wilmington community is invited to attend the meeting, including community members who may not have children in the school system.At Wilmington Public Schools: Wilmington Public Schools is taking part in Blue Shirt Day on Monday, October 1. All students are encouraged to wear blue. The campaign is organized by Stomp Out Bullying, the leading national anti-bullying and cyberbullying organization for kids and teens in America.At The Library: Wilmington Community Playgroup at 9:30am. Wilmington Networkers — Articulating Your Accomplishments at 10am. Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship Course at 6:30pm. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Blood Pressure at 9am. SBF Exercise at 9:45am. Special Exercise at 11am. Wii Bowling at 12:30pm. Book Club at 1pm. Quilting at 2:30pm. [Learn more HERE.](NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, August 26, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For October 3, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For October 29, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Saudi Arabia expanded ballistic missile program with Chinas aid Intel inputs

first_imgUS President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al SaudReutersTensions escalated between the United States and China following a report, which revealed that Saudi Arabia has notably escalated its ballistic missile program, with the help of China.According to US intelligence, the latest development threatens decades of the US government efforts to limit missile proliferation in the Middle East.Three sources who had direct intel of the matter said that the  administration did not initially disclose its knowledge of this classified development to key members of Congress, reports CNN.The sources further said that the Democrats were “infuriated” as they obtained information regarding the matter outside of regular US government channels and concluded it had been a deliberate effort as there were a series of the briefing where they say it “should have been presented”.The classified information indicates that apart from expansion in the missile infrastructure, Saudi Arabia has also purchased technology from China.The US had maintained its relationship with the Saudi leadership despite its role in the war in Yemen and the widely popular murder of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. To deter Iran’s “malign influence” in the Middle East, the Trump administration had recently declared an emergency to lock a deal worth $8.1 billion with Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Jordan amid Congress’s opposition to the move.Regarding the future repercussions of such proliferation, the sources have revealed that there the missile advancement marks another step in potential Saudi efforts to “one day deliver a nuclear warhead were it ever to obtain one.”The Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in a 2018 interview to CBS News had stated the possibility of obtaining nuclear weapons. “Without a doubt, if Iran developed a nuclear bomb, we will follow suit as soon as possible” he said.According to the regulations set forth by the 1987 Missile Technology Control Regime among the G7 industrialised countries to limit the risks of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), the Saudi is barred from purchasing from the US.Saudi’s decision to go ahead with its weapons proliferation to compete with Iran’s missile capability align suits China’s interests since it is not signatory to the pact. The US had been at ease as it was believed that since Saudi had purchased American military aircrafts, it wouldn’t go around US and purchase missile capabilities.Saudi Arabia ranked the largest importer of arms in the world, accounting for 12 percent of the total imports from 2014-2018, according to a recently published report by Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).As the recent development indicate that China has overtaken the US to supply weapons to the largest arms market, the possibility of US losing its largest arms market leaves a sour taste to the US in the midst of the ongoing US-China trade war.The Chinese Foreign Ministry said that China and Saudi Arabia are “comprehensive strategic partners,” and that both countries “maintain friendly cooperation in all areas, including in the area of arms sales. Such cooperation does not violate any international laws, nor does it involve the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.”last_img read more

Researchers use cryoelectron microscopy to learn how DNA wraps tightly around nucleosomes

first_img(Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Beijing, has used cryo-electron microscopy to reveal how it is that DNA wraps so tightly around nuclesomes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they managed to identify the path of linker DNA. Andrew Travers offers a Perspective piece in the same issue explaining the team’s findings and what it might mean for DNA research in the future. A specific ratio of DNA packaging proteins ensures normal gene expression during early embryonic development DNA in eukaryote cells (those with a nucleus surrounded by a membrane) comes packaged inside of what are known as nucleosomes, which are materials made up primarily of histone proteins—together they form chromatin. Prior research has shown that nucleosomes exist (due to folding) as coiled structured helix shapes, approximately 30nm in diameter. Inside each helix is a “linker” histone—a fiber that runs the length of the helix. Up until now, the molecular makeup of the linker has been a bit of a mystery, with competing researchers suggesting different ideas. In this new effort, the researchers in China appear to have settled the debate using cryo-electron microscopy, a form of transition electron microscopy where the material being studied is kept at cryogenic temperatures. Examination by the team revealed the linker histone fiber to be constructed from arrays of 12 nucleosomes.The arrayed nucleosomes constitute the longest segment of chromatin observed to date, and help explain how it is that genomes can be packaged, yet remain easily accessible. The researchers found that the linker histone (type H1) binds nucleosomes together into structures known as tetranucleosomal units—they in turn form double-helical structures similar to the DNA that they serve to package. The team notes that the binding that occurs results in stacking, which is how the double-helix is able to form. More information: Cryo-EM Study of the Chromatin Fiber Reveals a Double Helix Twisted by Tetranucleosomal Units, Science 25 April 2014: Vol. 344 no. 6182 pp. 376-380. DOI: 10.1126/science.1251413ABSTRACTThe hierarchical packaging of eukaryotic chromatin plays a central role in transcriptional regulation and other DNA-related biological processes. Here, we report the 11-angstrom–resolution cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of 30-nanometer chromatin fibers reconstituted in the presence of linker histone H1 and with different nucleosome repeat lengths. The structures show a histone H1-dependent left-handed twist of the repeating tetranucleosomal structural units, within which the four nucleosomes zigzag back and forth with a straight linker DNA. The asymmetric binding and the location of histone H1 in chromatin play a role in the formation of the 30-nanometer fiber. Our results provide mechanistic insights into how nucleosomes compact into higher-order chromatin fibers. Explore further Journal information: Science © 2014 Phys.org Play This video demonstrates how nucleosomes compact into higher-order chromatin fibers and how the hierarchical packaging of eukaryotic chromatin plays a central role in transcriptional regulation and other DNA-related biological processes. Credit: Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences The findings by the research team point out the important role H1 linker histones play in stacking nucleosomes, which, they note, serves to make chromatin compact. They also note that nucleosomes can fold into other helical structures under different circumstances, which opens the door to other research efforts in the future. Also as Travers points out, their results lead to other questions, such as whether the structures they’ve uncovered correspond to the fiber in its natural state or if there are others. There’s also the question of what happens when the helix is unwound, does it cause changes to internucleosomal interactions? Finding answers to such questions will likely be the focus of the research team in China as well as others working in the field for many years to come. Citation: Researchers use cryo-electron microscopy to learn how DNA wraps tightly around nucleosomes (2014, April 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-cryo-electron-microscopy-dna-tightly-nucleosomes.html PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more